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127 Possible Causes for 3-4 Hz Spike and Multispike, EEG Later Shows Generalized Spikes or Polyspikes and Focal Spikes, Progressive Action Tremor

Did you mean: 3-4 Hz Spike and Multispike, EEG Later Shows Generalized Spikes or Polyspikes and Focal, Spikes, Progressive Action Tremor

  • Benign Adult Familial Myoclonic Epilepsy

    Usually, myoclonic tremor is the presenting symptom, characterized by tremulous finger movements and myoclonic jerks of the limbs increased by action and posture.[uniprot.org] Childhood absence epilepsy with tonic-clonic seizures and electroencephalogram 3-4-Hz spike and multispike-slow wave complexes: linkage to chromosome 8q24.[reference.medscape.com] ) Cortical tremor is a form of rhythmic myoclonus, presenting as postural or action tremor in some patients with progressive myoclonus epilepsy (PME), 76, 77 in Angelman syndrome[clinicalgate.com]

  • Epilepsy

    Abstract Many episodic phenomena involving motor, sensory, autonomic, and behavioral functions may imitate epilepsy. The aim of this article is to focus on the various manifestations and the diagnostic and therapeutic challenges of the most common of these disorders, as well as their relationship to emotional[…][oadoi.org]

    Missing: Progressive Action Tremor
  • Generalized Clonic or Tonic-Clonic Seizures

    ‘Contrary to popular folk belief, nothing should be placed in the mouth during the seizure. Severe injury could occur.’ Generalized tonic clonic seizures (grand mal seizures) are the most common and best known type of generalized seizure. They begin with stiffening of the limbs (the tonic phase), followed by jerking[…][epilepsynw.org]

    Missing: Progressive Action Tremor
  • Juvenile Myoclonic Epilepsy

    Delayed diagnosis of juvenile myoclonic epilepsy. R A Grünewald, E Chroni, C P Panayiotopoulos Department of Clinical Neurophysiology and Epilepsy, St Thomas' Hospital, London, UK. Abstract Fifteen cases of juvenile myoclonic epilepsy (JME) were identified from one hundred and eighty consecutive patients referred to a[…][doi.org]

    Missing: Progressive Action Tremor
  • West Syndrome

    Multiregional wide-distribution hemorrhages of the left hemisphere occurred at 1 month of age in a girl with congenital factor V deficiency. At the age of 4 months, symmetrical spasms appeared in clusters and electroencephalography showed diffuse background attenuation in the left side and hypsarrhythmia only in[…][ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]

    Missing: Progressive Action Tremor
  • Idiopathic Generalized Epilepsy

    Epilepsia. 2012 Dec;53(12):2079-90. doi: 10.1111/j.1528-1167.2012.03723.x. Epub 2012 Oct 25. Author information 1 Department of Medicine, St. Vincent's Hospital, The University of Melbourne, Victoria Parade, Fitzroy, Victoria, Australia. udaya.seneviratne@svhm.org.au Abstract Prognosis describes the trajectory and long-term[…][ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]

    Missing: Progressive Action Tremor
  • Juvenile Absence Epilepsy

    Childhood absence epilepsy with tonic-clonic seizures and electroencephalogram 3-4-Hz spike and multispike-slow wave complexes: linkage to chromosome 8q24.[reference.medscape.com]

    Missing: Progressive Action Tremor
  • Myoclonic-Astatic Epilepsy

    The objective of the study was to explore clinical, electroencephalography (EEG), neuropsychological features and prognosis of myoclonic-astatic epilepsy (MAE). Of 327 children aged between 1 and 9 years with a diagnosis of generalized epilepsy followed between 2000 and 2008, 18 (5.5%) had MAE. Male significantly[…][ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]

    Missing: Progressive Action Tremor
  • Organic Brain Syndrome

    Abstract This study addresses the prevalence of organic brain syndrome (OBS) among long-term toluene-exposed rotagravure workers who are still working. The prevalence of OBS in 22 workers exposed to toluene for a minimum of 12 years and 19 unexposed control subjects, matched for age and employment status,[…][ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]

    Missing: Progressive Action Tremor
  • Encephalopathy

    Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome is an encephalopathy that can be clinically characterized by headache, altered mental status and/or seizures. Neuroimaging demonstrates usually reversible bilateral subcortical vasogenic occipital-parietal edema. Exact pathophysiology remains unclear but is commonly[…][ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]

    Missing: Progressive Action Tremor

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