Create issue ticket

138 Possible Causes for Abnormal Vertical Eye Movements

  • Transient Ischemic Attack

    […] or rotatory eye movements that stop after 30‐60sec, and fatigability if the test is repeated Head thrust test: Abnormal test (unilateral latency in eye repositioning when[emergencymedicinecases.com] […] pinprick sensation asymmetry are usually central Dix Hallpike test: Useful in ruling in BPPV only if CLASSIC response: brief latency of 3‐5 seconds, dramatic response with vertical[emergencymedicinecases.com]

  • Duane Retraction Syndrome

    Duane retraction syndrome (DRS) consists of deficient horizontal eye movements, eyelid retraction, palpebral fissure narrowing, and abnormal vertical eye movements.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov] This disorder consists of deficient horizontal eye movements, eyelid retraction, palpebral fissure narrowing, and abnormal vertical eye movements.[emedicine.com]

  • Benign Adult Familial Myoclonic Epilepsy

    The cause is unknown; neuroimaging is required to exclude structural brain abnormalities. Vertical eye movements occur, these are rapid and side-to-side.[epilepsydiagnosis.org] Spasmus nutans This disorder of eye movement is seen in infants, typically with onset between 4 and 12 months of age.[epilepsydiagnosis.org]

  • Paraneoplastic Syndrome

    Neuro-ophthalmic symptoms and signs are relatively common and include the following: Abnormal eye movements Opsoclonus (Ri antibodies) Ocular flutter (Ri antibodies) Cerebellar[neuro-ophthalmology.stanford.edu] […] degeneration (Yo antibodies) Nystagmus Slow saccades, limited vertical movements (Hu, Ma/Ta antibodies) Neuromuscular junction disorder (Lambert–Eaton syndrome or myasthenic[neuro-ophthalmology.stanford.edu]

  • Nystagmus

    ) and saccade were normal, and vertical eye movements were also normal.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov] eye movement.’[en.oxforddictionaries.com] Nystagmus: Rapid, rhythmic, repetitious, and involuntary eye movements. Nystagmus can be horizontal, vertical, or rotary.[medicinenet.com]

  • Infantile Convulsions and Choreoathetosis

    The cause is unknown; neuroimaging is required to exclude structural brain abnormalities. Vertical eye movements occur, these are rapid and side-to-side.[epilepsydiagnosis.org] Spasmus nutans This disorder of eye movement is seen in infants, typically with onset between 4 and 12 months of age.[epilepsydiagnosis.org]

  • Abdominal Epilepsy

    The cause is unknown; neuroimaging is required to exclude structural brain abnormalities. Vertical eye movements occur, these are rapid and side-to-side.[epilepsydiagnosis.org] Spasmus nutans This disorder of eye movement is seen in infants, typically with onset between 4 and 12 months of age.[epilepsydiagnosis.org]

  • Classic Progressive Supranuclear Palsy Syndrome

    Progressive supranuclear palsy is characterized by decreased cognition, abnormal eye movements (supranuclear vertical gaze palsy), postural instability and falls, as well[radiopaedia.org] Clinical description PSP usually manifests during the sixth or seventh decade of life with postural instability and falls, slowing of vertical saccadic eye movements and cognitive[orpha.net] Progressively patients develop other eye abnormalities (dry and red eyes, blurred vision, spontaneous involuntary eyelid closure, photophobia), a dysexecutive cognitive syndrome[orpha.net]

  • Motor Neuron Disease

    The patient had noted clumsiness and weakness in all extremities 5 years before presentation of abnormal eye movements.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov] However, supranuclear vertical gaze palsy and slow saccades are seen.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]

  • Progressive Supranuclear Palsy

    Progressive supranuclear palsy is characterized by decreased cognition, abnormal eye movements (supranuclear vertical gaze palsy), postural instability and falls, as well[radiopaedia.org] We report the case of a 75-year-old ex-professional boxer who developed diplopia and eye movement abnormalities in his 60's followed by memory impairment, low mood and recurrent[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov] Clinical description PSP usually manifests during the sixth or seventh decade of life with postural instability and falls, slowing of vertical saccadic eye movements and cognitive[orpha.net]

Further symptoms