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257 Possible Causes for Absent Ankle Reflex

  • Sciatic Neuropathy

    A person's reflexes may be abnormal, with weak or absent ankle-jerk reflex. Several different tests can be performed to find the cause of sciatic nerve dysfunction.[medlineplus.gov] The left ankle reflex was absent, but the knee jerk and plantar responses were normal. There were no petechiae or ecchymoses over the buttocks.[jamanetwork.com] The ankle reflex is depressed or absent on the involved side. This complete deficit is seen only in severe lesions or late in the course of sciatic neuropathy.[clinicalgate.com]

  • Cauda Equina Syndrome

    .  Physical Exam:  Right plantar flexor weakness, absent right ankle reflex, and decreased anal sphincter tone.  Findings consistent w/ CES  Referral:  Medically evacuated[slideshare.net] Also, there may be decreased anal tone; sexual dysfunction; saddle anesthesia; bilateral leg pain and weakness; and bilateral absence of ankle reflexes.[urmc.rochester.edu] Sciatica -type pain on one side or both sides, although pain may be wholly absent Weakness of the muscles of the lower legs (often paraplegia ) Achilles (ankle) reflex absent[en.wikipedia.org]

  • Charcot Marie Tooth Disease

    Five months after the transient CNS symptoms, he finally developed signs and symptoms of neuropathy in the form of absent ankle reflexes.[pediatrics.aappublications.org] Ankle reflexes were bilaterally absent. Sequencing revealed a novel heterozygous c.712C T (p.R238C) mutation in the GJB1 gene.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov] Reflexes at the ankles are diminished or absent in individuals with leg muscle weakness and sensory deficits.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]

  • Guillain-Barré Syndrome

    F waves implicates nerve root involvement delayed/absent H reflex correlates with decreased/absent ankle reflex MRI cauda equina gandolinium enhancement in acute cases DIfferential[step2.medbullets.com] Exam is remarkable for symetric 3/5 lower and upper extremity weakness, absent ankle and patellar reflexes and 1 biceps reflex.[step2.medbullets.com] […] conduction velocity reduced amplitude in compound muscle action potentials reduced amplitude with relatively preserved conduction velocity implicates axonal neuropathy delayed/absent[step2.medbullets.com]

  • Lumbosacral Plexus Disorder

    Patellar tendon reflex and ankle jerk were absent on the right leg. Sensory function could not be examined properly.[austinpublishinggroup.com] There is an absent or reduced knee jerk reflex, although ankle jerks are commonly preserved.[patient.info]

  • Diabetic Polyneuropathy

    The ankle tendon reflex was absent in almost half of our patients (40.4 %).[em-consulte.com] reflexes: Absent Associated with foot ulcers in chronic DM 7x increase Age: Middle-aged & elderly Location: Soles of feet Neuropathic osteoarthropathy : Frequency increased[neuromuscular.wustl.edu] In prospective studies, the three main independent predictors for foot ulceration have been shown to be absent ankle tendon reflex, impaired monofilament pressure sensation[em-consulte.com]

  • Spinal Muscular Atrophy

    In both, knee and ankle reflexes were absent and sensation was intact. Serum creatine kinase levels were normal.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]

  • Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy

    Ankle reflexes are usually reduced or absent, and knee reflexes may also be reduced in some cases.[clinical.diabetesjournals.org] Ankle and knee reflexes were absent or diminished in 28.2% (n   95) and 11.6% (n   39) of patients respectively.[dmsjournal.biomedcentral.com]

  • Peripheral Neuropathy

    Classically, ankle jerk reflex is absent in peripheral neuropathy.[en.wikipedia.org] Ankle reflexes are usually reduced or absent, and knee reflexes may also be reduced in some cases.[clinical.diabetesjournals.org] A physical examination will involve testing the deep ankle reflex as well as examining the feet for any ulceration.[en.wikipedia.org]

  • Tabes Dorsalis

    The patellar and ankle reflexes were absent and there was loss of vibratory and position sense in the lower extremity.[lksom.temple.edu]

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