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44 Possible Causes for Agitation, Dyspnea with Sudden Onset, Lip Cyanosis

  • Asthma

    Her attacks are characterized by the relatively sudden onset of dyspnea; they are more frequent in the spring and fall, when they are often preceded by symptoms of rhino-conjunctivitis[doi.org] Extrathoracic respiratory signs should also be systematically looked for, including cyanosis, finger deformation, pulsus paradoxus, and pursed lips breathing.[erj.ersjournals.com] These properties render it particularly promising for the management of severe agitation in children admitted to the ED with acute asthma exacerbation.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]

  • Pulmonary Edema

    Sudden onset of dyspnea. Severe anxiety, restlessness, irritability. Cool, moist skin.[slideshare.net] The heart rate is usually over 120 per minute, the pulse may be very weak and the lips and fingernail beds may be blue (cyanosis).[publications.americanalpineclub.org] Neurogenic pulmonary edema is suggested by her acute agitation.[professional.diabetes.org]

  • Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome

    Definition Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), is a life-threatening condition which is characterised by the sudden onset of severe dyspnea and hypoxaemia [1].[physio-pedia.com] Cyanosis (blue skin, lips, and nails caused by lack of oxygen to the tissues) is often seen.[nlm.nih.gov] This often leads to restlessness and patient agitation, which can lead to high pressures in the lung or even cause oxygen levels to drop even further.[foundation.chestnet.org]

  • Congestive Heart Failure

    Int Heart J. 2017 May 31;58(3):378-384. doi: 10.1536/ihj.16-226. Epub 2017 May 23. Takasu K 1 , Miyazaki T 1 , Negoro K 1 , Yatsu S 1 , Shimizu M 1 , Murata A 1 , Kato T 1 , Suda S 1 , Hiki M 1 , Kasai T 1 , Miyauchi K 1 , Daida H 1 . Author information 1 Department of Cardiovascular Medicine, Juntendo University Graduate[…][ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]

  • Aspiration Pneumonia

    Pink-colored to red sputum (hemoptysis) Bluish tinge of the lips, fingers and/or toes (cyanosis) Causes Aspiration pneumonia is unlikely to arise in a healthy person who is[healthhype.com] Medicine -- Section 2: Critical Care -- Chapter 137: Inpatient Cardiac Arrest and Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation -- Chapter 138: Acute Respiratory Failure -- Chapter 139: Pain, Agitation[worldcat.org] Respiratory Failure -- Chapter 148: Principles of Mechanical Ventilation -- Chapter 149: Nutrition in Pulmonary Disease -- Chapter 150: Diagnosis and Treatment of Pain, Agitation[worldcat.org]

  • Pneumococcal Pneumonia

    A 30-year-old confirmed body packer was brought to our emergency department from jail because of agitation and mydriasis.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov] Fever and chills Mental status changes Nausea and vomiting Sensitivity to light ( photophobia ) Severe headache Stiff neck Other symptoms that can occur with this disease: Agitation[m.medlineplus.gov]

  • Bacterial Pneumonia

    Sudden onset of symptoms and rapid illness progression are associated with bacterial pneumonias.[emedicine.medscape.com] Chest pain, dyspnea, hemoptysis (when clearly delineated from hematemesis), decreased exercise tolerance, and abdominal pain from pleuritis are also highly indicative of a[emedicine.medscape.com]

  • Atelectasis

    Larger areas of atelectasis may lead to: Rapid breathing Taking shallow breaths Agitation Coughing Decreased chest movement during breathing Wheezing Fever Blueness of the[winchesterhospital.org]

  • Pulmonary Embolism

    Consecutive patients with clinically suspected pulmonary embolism, defined as a sudden onset of dyspnea, sudden deterioration of existing dyspnea, or sudden onset of pleuritic[doi.org] […] to the lips and is negative for chest pain, abdominal distress and peripheral edema.[emsworld.com] Hypoxia, which may cause anxiety, restlessness, agitation and impaired consciousness. Pyrexia. Elevated jugular venous pressure.[patient.info]

  • Fat Embolism

    Onset is sudden. Presenting symptoms are myriad and include tachypnea, dyspnea and tachycardia.[journalofethics.ama-assn.org] Neurologic manifestations can range from headache, confusion, and agitation to stupor and, less commonly, coma.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov] Tachypnea, dyspnea, and hypoxia appear as a result of ventilation-perfusion abnormalities 12-72 hours after injury.[emedicine.medscape.com]

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