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15 Possible Causes for Alkaline Phosphatase Increased, Physiological Neonatal Jaundice, Yellow Discoloration of the Skin

  • Liver Cirrhosis

    […] history of alcohol excess, neonatal jaundice, hypertension, or hypercholesterolemia.[atsjournals.org] Yellow discoloration in the skin and eyes (jaundice) Fluid accumulation in your abdomen (ascites) Spiderlike blood vessels on your skin Redness in the palms of the hands[mayoclinic.org] phosphatase (ALP).[qi.quintessenz.de]

  • Neonatal Hepatitis

    Infants with this condition are usually jaundiced. Jaundice that is caused by neonatal hepatitis is not the same as physiologic neonatal jaundice.[en.wikipedia.org] The common symptoms include jaundice (yellow discoloration of the skin and the whites of the eyes) and hepatomegaly (liver enlargement).[biology-online.org] Serum alanine aminotransferase and aspartate aminotransferase showed moderate elevations (110 IU/l and 61.5 IU/l, respectively), as well as the alkaline phosphatase which[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]

  • Extrahepatic Cholestasis

    Whereas physiologic jaundice constitutes a common finding in neonates, a few cases present with cholestatic jaundice owing to various pathologic conditions, including extrahepatic[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov] discoloration of the skin (jaundice), dark urine, and pale stools.[medical-dictionary.thefreedictionary.com] Alkaline phosphatase may be increased even if only a few small bile ducts are obstructed, and serum bilirubin is normal.[clinlabnavigator.com]

  • Jaundice

    This is called “physiologic” or normal neonatal jaundice. Most infants have this pattern so no testing is needed.[patients.gi.org] Jaundice is a yellow discoloration of the skin and mucous membranes caused by an excess accumulation of bilirubin in the blood.[medcomic.com] Three days after initiation of ECMO, the patient developed jaundice, with increase of bilirubin, Gamma-glutamyltransferase and Alkaline phosphatase, without elevation of alanine[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]

  • Biliary Atresia

    Issues that should raise your concern: Prolonged neonatal jaundice Physiologic jaundice in healthy, full-term newborns typically resolves by the 5th or 6th day.[pedemmorsels.com] discoloration of the skin and whites of the eyes due to an abnormally high level of bilirubin (bile pigment) in the bloodstream, which is then excreted through the kidneys[beaumont.org] , 341 IU/L) increased the total bilirubin, direct bilirubin, and γ -GT in all patients of both groups and increased alkaline phosphatase in three patients of group A and ten[e-ultrasonography.org]

  • Indian Childhood Cirrhosis

    It typically presents with transient neonatal jaundice, in a child who is otherwise healthy, and progresses to biliary cirrhosis and portal hypertension.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov] Yellow discoloring of the skin, eye, and mucus membranes because of increased bilirubin (at least 2–3 mg/dL or 30 mmol/L). Urine may also appear dark. Asterixis.[gutenberg.us] discoloration of the skin and mucous membranes, (with the white of the eye being especially noticeable) due to increased bilirubin (at least 2–3 mg/dl or 30 µmol/l).[en.wikipedia.org]

  • Gilbert Syndrome

    jaundice, unspecified 2016 2017 2018 2019 Billable/Specific Code Code on Newborn Record Applicable To Neonatal physiological jaundice (intense)(prolonged) NOS due to or associated[icd10data.com] High levels of bilirubin in the blood may produce jaundice (a yellow discoloration of the skin and/or eyes), and in the urine may produce a tea-coloured appearance.[liver.ca] The alkaline phosphatase was increased at 80 IU/L. The total protein and the albumin levels were normal.[apicareonline.com]

  • Rotor Syndrome

    Neonatal jaundice and Breast-milk jaundice Conjugated hyperbilirubinaemia Hepatocellular – Diminished hepatocyte function.[lifeinthefastlane.com] Introduction Jaundice refers to yellow discoloration of the skin, sclera, mucous membranes, and body fluids.[pedsinreview.aappublications.org] Blood workup usually shows no abnormalities of aminotransferase, gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase, prothrombin time and alkaline phosphatase levels, although occasional mild[symptoma.com]

  • Crigler-Najjar Syndrome Type 2

    Physiological neonatal jaundice may peak at 85–170 µmol/l and decline to normal adult concentrations within two weeks. Prematurity results in higher levels.[en.wikipedia.org] This leads to jaundice, i.e. yellow discoloration of skin and eyes. Excess bilirubin can also damage the brain, muscles, and nerves.[medindia.net] .)  LFT-Familial increase in serum alkaline phosphatase level.  Blood test before and after a meal in which a diet is presribed on reduced calorie intake for 48 hrs.Gs pts[slideshare.net]

  • Hereditary Spherocytosis

    Applicable To Neonatal physiological jaundice (intense)(prolonged) NOS spherocytosis D58.0 (congenital) Spherocytosis (congenital) (familial) (hereditary) D58.0 hemoglobin[icd10data.com] Jaundice - yellow discoloration of the skin and white part of eyeball. Enlarged spleen (splenomegaly) - palpable on the left side of abdomen beneath the rib cage.[symptoma.com] […] and basophils are commonly seen, neutrophil alkaline phosphatase positive rate is 1%, score 2.[degruyter.com]

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