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32 Possible Causes for Anemia, Physiological Neonatal Jaundice, Yellow Discoloration of the Skin

  • Neonatal Jaundice

    Publication type, MeSH terms, Substances, Supplementary concepts Publication type Case Reports MeSH terms Anemia, Hemolytic, Congenital/blood Anemia, Hemolytic, Congenital[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov] Jaundice, Physiological NeonatalNeonatal Jaundice, Physiological — Severe Jaundice in Newborn — Severe Jaundice in Neonate — Icterus Gravis Neonatorum[mesh.kib.ki.se] Definition Neonatal jaundice is the yellowing discoloration of the skin and sclera of a neonate, which is caused by increased levels of bilirubin in the blood.[bestpractice.bmj.com]

  • Physiological Neonatal Jaundice

    […] of the level of bilirubin in the blood is of value in detecting elevated bilirubin levels at the earliest stages before jaundice appears, when liver disease or hemolytic anemia[medical-dictionary.thefreedictionary.com] Published on Jul 10, 2016 Physiological Neonatal Jaundice and Its causes. Physiological Neonatal Jaundice 1. PHYSIOLOGICAL NEONATAL JAUNDICE 10/07/2016 1 2.[slideshare.net] Definition (MSH) Yellow discoloration of the SKIN; MUCOUS MEMBRANE; and SCLERA in the NEWBORN. It is a sign of NEONATAL HYPERBILIRUBINEMIA.[fpnotebook.com]

  • Jaundice

    The classical clinical features of hereditary spherocytosis are anemia, jaundice, and splenomegaly.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov] This is called “physiologic” or normal neonatal jaundice. Most infants have this pattern so no testing is needed.[patients.gi.org] Jaundice is a yellow discoloration of the skin and mucous membranes caused by an excess accumulation of bilirubin in the blood.[medcomic.com]

  • Liver Cirrhosis

    Glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) is a widely used marker of glycemic control but can be affected by hemolytic anemia.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov] […] history of alcohol excess, neonatal jaundice, hypertension, or hypercholesterolemia.[atsjournals.org] Yellow discoloration in the skin and eyes (jaundice) Fluid accumulation in your abdomen (ascites) Spiderlike blood vessels on your skin Redness in the palms of the hands[mayoclinic.org]

  • Hereditary Spherocytosis

    Applicable To Neonatal physiological jaundice (intense)(prolonged) NOS spherocytosis D58.0 (congenital) Spherocytosis (congenital) (familial) (hereditary) D58.0 hemoglobin[icd10data.com] Jaundice - yellow discoloration of the skin and white part of eyeball. Enlarged spleen (splenomegaly) - palpable on the left side of abdomen beneath the rib cage.[symptoma.com] To date only three siblings with coinheritance of sickle cell anemia (SCA) and hereditary spherocytosis (HS) have been reported.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]

  • Kernicterus

    The infant was found to have a serum indirect bilirubin of 49 mg/dl secondary to isoimmune hemolytic anemia due to anti-c antibody.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov] Nielsen HE, Haase P, Blaabjerg J, Stryhn H, Hilden J: Risk factors and sib correlation in physiological neonatal jaundice. Acta Paediatr Scand 1987;76:504–511.[karger.com] Overview Infant jaundice is yellow discoloration of a newborn baby's skin and eyes.[mayoclinic.org]

  • Fetal Erythroblastosis

    Both infants presented with severe symptomatic anemia ( Table 1 ).[doi.org] Serum bilirubin kinetics in intermittent phototherapy of physiological jaundice. Arch Dis Child. 1984 ; 59 : 892 – 894 18. McDonagh AF, Lightner DA.[pediatrics.aappublications.org] After delivery bilirubin is no longer cleared (via the placenta) from the neonate's blood and the symptoms of jaundice (yellowish skin and yellow discoloration of the whites[en.wikipedia.org]

  • Hypercarotinemia

    Anemia is managed by eating iron rich foods and talking a supplement for about a month or two.[symptomscausestreatmentprevention.blogspot.com] One of the most common types of jaundice is known as neonatal jaundice (also called physiological jaundice).[medfriendly.com] […] hi"per-kar" cah te ne' me-ah an excessive amount of carotene in the blood usually associated with a yellow discoloration of the skin. hy·per·car·o·te·ne·mi·a ( hīpĕr-kārŏ-tĕ-nēmē-ă[medical-dictionary.thefreedictionary.com]

  • Crigler-Najjar Syndrome Type 1

    Physiological neonatal jaundice may peak at 85–170 µmol/l and decline to normal adult concentrations within two weeks. Prematurity results in higher levels.[en.wikipedia.org] This leads to jaundice, i.e. yellow discoloration of skin and eyes. Excess bilirubin can also damage the brain, muscles, and nerves.[medindia.net] E70-E88 Metabolic disorders Type 1 Excludes androgen insensitivity syndrome ( E34.5- ) congenital adrenal hyperplasia ( E25.0 ) Ehlers-Danlos syndrome ( Q79.6 ) hemolytic anemias[icd10data.com]

  • Maternofetal Transfusion

    Some of the most common causes of neonatal jaundice include Physiologic hyperbilirubinemia Breastfeeding jaundice Breast milk jaundice Pathologic hyperbilirubinemia due to[merckmanuals.com] […] infants Jaundice is a yellow discoloration of the skin and eyes caused by hyperbilirubinemia (elevated serum bilirubin concentration).[slideplayer.com] Our initial impression was severe fetal anemia leading to birth asphyxia. The cause of fetal anemia was most likely to be due to fetomaternal hemorrhage.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]

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