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29 Possible Causes for Artrioventricular Canal Defect, Systolic Thrill at Lower Left Sternal Border

  • Patent Ductus Arteriosus

    What is it? Patent ductus arteriosus (pronounced pay-tent duck-tus are-teer-e-o-sus) happens when a blood vessel fails to close after a baby is born. The ductus arteriosus is the temporary blood vessel that allows blood to bypass a baby's lungs before it is born. It is a blood vessel that joins the pulmonary[…][web.archive.org]

  • Ventricular Septal Defect

    3 to 4/6 holosystolic murmur (with or without thrill) at the lower left sternal border; this murmur is usually audible within the first few days of life (see table Heart[msdmanuals.com] Muscular defects can be heard along the lower left sternal border and may vary in intensity as the defect size changes with muscular contraction throughout systole.[circ.ahajournals.org] Small VSDs typically produce murmurs ranging from a grade 1 to 2/6 high-pitched, short systolic murmur (due to tiny defects that actually close during late systole) to a grade[msdmanuals.com]

  • Tetralogy of Fallot

    Systolic thrill at the lower left sternal border. Aortic ejection click.[patient.info] A patient without cyanosis has a long, loud, systolic murmur with a thrill along the right ventricular outflow tract (RVOT).[patient.info] […] older child with long-standing cyanosis (without surgery) may present with the following signs: Cardiac Right ventricular predominance on palpation or possibly a bulging left[patient.info]

  • Large Ventricular Septal Defect

    3 to 4/6 holosystolic murmur (with or without thrill) at the lower left sternal border; this murmur is usually audible within the first few days of life (see table Heart[merckmanuals.com] Small VSDs typically produce murmurs ranging from a grade 1 to 2/6 high-pitched, short systolic murmur (due to tiny defects that actually close during late systole) to a grade[merckmanuals.com]

  • Atrial Septal Defect

    Congenital Atrial Septal Defects (ASD) Glossary The heart is divided into four separate chambers. The upper chambers, or atria, are divided by a wall called the septum. An atrial septal defect (ASD) is a hole in that septum. Atrial septal defects are one of the most common heart defects seen. When an atrial septal[…][cincinnatichildrens.org]

    Missing: Systolic Thrill at Lower Left Sternal Border
  • Mitral Valve Prolapse

    BACKGROUND: Arrhythmic mitral valve prolapse (MVP) is characterized by myxomatous leaflets and left ventricular (LV) fibrosis of papillary muscles and inferobasal wall. We searched for morphofunctional abnormalities of the mitral valve that could explain a regional mechanical myocardial stretch. METHODS AND RESULTS:[…][ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]

    Missing: Systolic Thrill at Lower Left Sternal Border
  • Ostium Primum Atrial Septal Defect

    The ostium primum atrial septal defect is a defect in the atrial septum at the level of the tricuspid and mitral valves. This is sometimes known as an endocardial cushion defect because it often involves the endocardial cushion, which is the portion of the heart where the atrial septum meets the ventricular septum[…][en.wikipedia.org]

    Missing: Systolic Thrill at Lower Left Sternal Border
  • Patent Foramen Ovale

    Brain abscesses are frequently caused by poly-microbial conditions. Comparatively, brain abscesses caused by Prevotella species are very rare. Right-to-left cardiac shunting due to a patent foramen ovale may predispose patients to infection. We report an isolated Prevotella brain abscess that occurred in a[…][ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]

    Missing: Systolic Thrill at Lower Left Sternal Border
  • Endocardial Cushion Defect

    We describe one case of endocardial cushion defect during the second trimester when a consultative fetal echocardiography was undertaken for fetal intrauterine growth retardation with oligohydramnios. Positive cytomegalovirus IgM in cord blood and cytomegalovirus DNA particles in the amniotic fluid were found[…][ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]

    Missing: Systolic Thrill at Lower Left Sternal Border
  • Pulmonary Veno-Occlusive Disease

    Pulmonary veno-occlusive disease (PVOD) is considered to be a subtype of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) and is characterized by obstruction of small pulmonary veins that leads to increased pressure in the pulmonary circulation. Progressively worsening dyspnea and signs of heart failure such as fatigue and[…][symptoma.com]

    Missing: Systolic Thrill at Lower Left Sternal Border

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