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22 Possible Causes for Ascites, Physiological Neonatal Jaundice, Yellow Discoloration of the Skin

  • Physiological Neonatal Jaundice

    Published on Jul 10, 2016 Physiological Neonatal Jaundice and Its causes. Physiological Neonatal Jaundice 1. PHYSIOLOGICAL NEONATAL JAUNDICE 10/07/2016 1 2.[slideshare.net] Definition (MSH) Yellow discoloration of the SKIN; MUCOUS MEMBRANE; and SCLERA in the NEWBORN. It is a sign of NEONATAL HYPERBILIRUBINEMIA.[fpnotebook.com] […] albumin use in clinical Profile hepatic albumin treatment of ascites albumin and its functions Bilirubin is responsible for yellowing (jaundice, jaundice) of mucous membranes[spazioinwind.libero.it]

  • Liver Cirrhosis

    The serum-ascites albumin gradient value of 1.9 g/dL and the total protein level in the ascites of 3.1 g/dL indicated the ascites to have been caused by portal hypertension[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov] […] history of alcohol excess, neonatal jaundice, hypertension, or hypercholesterolemia.[atsjournals.org] Yellow discoloration in the skin and eyes (jaundice) Fluid accumulation in your abdomen (ascites) Spiderlike blood vessels on your skin Redness in the palms of the hands[mayoclinic.org]

  • Neonatal Hepatitis

    Infants with this condition are usually jaundiced. Jaundice that is caused by neonatal hepatitis is not the same as physiologic neonatal jaundice.[en.wikipedia.org] The common symptoms include jaundice (yellow discoloration of the skin and the whites of the eyes) and hepatomegaly (liver enlargement).[biology-online.org] It is increasingly recognized that a syndrome of self-limiting perinatal ascites can accompany the haemolysis.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]

  • Jaundice

    Serious problems caused by liver disease can include Ascites : Accumulation of fluid within the abdomen Hepatic encephalopathy : Deterioration of brain function because the[merckmanuals.com] This is called “physiologic” or normal neonatal jaundice. Most infants have this pattern so no testing is needed.[patients.gi.org] Jaundice is a yellow discoloration of the skin and mucous membranes caused by an excess accumulation of bilirubin in the blood.[medcomic.com]

  • Galactosemia

    […] the following symptoms: jaundice, hepatomegaly, failure to thrive, feeding difficulties, hypoglycemia, convulsions, lethargy, amino-aciduria, cataracts, hepatic cirrhosis, ascites[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov] Applicable To Neonatal physiological jaundice (intense)(prolonged) NOS due to or associated with galactosemia E74.21 ICD-10-CM Codes Adjacent To E74.21 E74.09 Other glycogen[icd10data.com] In some cases, ascites is spotted during early infancy. In rare occasions, it is diagnosed within the first few days of life.[symptoma.com]

  • Indian Childhood Cirrhosis

    Among children admitted to a further double blind trial who had ICC but who had not yet developed jaundice or ascites 10 treated with penicillamine and 10 treated with penicillamine[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov] It typically presents with transient neonatal jaundice, in a child who is otherwise healthy, and progresses to biliary cirrhosis and portal hypertension.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov] Yellow discoloring of the skin, eye, and mucus membranes because of increased bilirubin (at least 2–3 mg/dL or 30 mmol/L). Urine may also appear dark. Asterixis .[gutenberg.us]

  • Fetal Erythroblastosis

    Also, the newborn will have peripheral edema and other liquid accumulations, like ascites, pleurisy, and pericardial effusion.[symptoma.com] Serum bilirubin kinetics in intermittent phototherapy of physiological jaundice. Arch Dis Child. 1984 ; 59 : 892 – 894 18. McDonagh AF, Lightner DA.[pediatrics.aappublications.org] After delivery bilirubin is no longer cleared (via the placenta) from the neonate's blood and the symptoms of jaundice (yellowish skin and yellow discoloration of the whites[en.wikipedia.org]

  • Crigler-Najjar Syndrome Type 1

    We provide pre- and post-liver transplantation evaluations and care, and treat patients with complications of portal hypertension, such as variceal bleeding, ascites and encephalopathy[northwell.edu] Physiological neonatal jaundice may peak at 85–170 µmol/l and decline to normal adult concentrations within two weeks. Prematurity results in higher levels.[en.wikipedia.org] This leads to jaundice, i.e. yellow discoloration of skin and eyes. Excess bilirubin can also damage the brain, muscles, and nerves.[medindia.net]

  • Biliary Atresia

    There were significant associations between ascites and sepsis with the liver transplant score of  8 (p value   0.006 and 0.014, respectively), whereas post-operative bilirubin[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov] Issues that should raise your concern: Prolonged neonatal jaundice Physiologic jaundice in healthy, full-term newborns typically resolves by the 5th or 6th day.[pedemmorsels.com] discoloration of the skin and whites of the eyes due to an abnormally high level of bilirubin (bile pigment) in the bloodstream, which is then excreted through the kidneys[beaumont.org]

  • Extrahepatic Cholestasis

    Whereas physiologic jaundice constitutes a common finding in neonates, a few cases present with cholestatic jaundice owing to various pathologic conditions, including extrahepatic[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov] discoloration of the skin (jaundice), dark urine, and pale stools.[medical-dictionary.thefreedictionary.com] […] the diagnosis is confirmed, surgical excision is the best therapy. [12] Spontaneous perforation of the bile duct in infancy lead to conjugated hyperbilirubinaemia, biliary ascites[saudijgastro.com]

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