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30 Possible Causes for Bilateral Ankle Clonus, Toe-Walking Gait

  • Cerebral Palsy

    […] one foot or leg dragging; walking on the toes, a crouched gait, or a “scissored” gait; and muscle tone that is either too stiff or too floppy.[ninds.nih.gov] OUTCOMES: Internal hip rotation and toe walking occurred when orthoses blocked digit extension.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov] Early symptoms include: Lack of coordination Stiff arms or legs Weak muscles Exaggerated reflexes Walking with a limp Walking on the toes Crouched gait Symptoms of cerebral[rileychildrens.org]

  • Cerebral Palsy with Spastic Diplegia

    Other signs and symptoms may include delayed motor or movement milestones (i.e. rolling over, sitting, standing); walking on toes; and a "scissored" gait (style of walking[rarediseases.info.nih.gov] They may walk on their toes, or walk with a scissored gait.[birthinjurysafety.org] Both toe walking and flexed knees are common attributes and can be corrected with proper surgical treatment and gait analysis.[cerebralpalsylawdoctor.com]

  • Myelopathy

    She was diffusely hyper-reflexic with sustained right ankle clonus, positive crossed adductor, suprapatellar, and pectoralis reflexes, bilateral plantar extensor responses[touchneurology.com] bilateral Babinski signs.[jamanetwork.com] She exhibited a spastic gait on the right with inability to heel walk or tandem walk. She had difficulty squatting.[touchneurology.com]

  • Spastic Paraplegia

    The deep tendon reflexes were increased in all four limbs, but Babinski sign was not elicited bilaterally. Neither ankle nor knee clonus was observed.[nature.com] Both toe walking and flexed knees are common attributes and can be corrected with proper surgical treatment and gait analysis.[cerebralpalsylawdoctor.com] Gait abnormalities may include reduced stride length, toe walking, circumduction, dragging of toes, scissoring, hyperlordosis, or hyperextension at the knees.[now.aapmr.org]

  • Spinal Epidural Abscess

    The knee and ankle jerk were exaggerated and the plantars were up, bilaterally. Patellar clonus was present, with hypoesthesia below D 9 level.[atmph.org] Gait testing, including heel and toe walking, can pick up subtle findings such as weakness in big toe dorsiflexion (L5).[epmonthly.com] Your neurologic exam including gait, motor, and sensory exams were normal. The first aspect of picking up SEA is a complete physical exam.[epmonthly.com]

  • Cervical Myelopathy

    Your GP will also want to examine your gait and will most likely ask you to walk up and down the room and will get you to stand on your tip toes and then heels.[clinic-hq.co.uk]

  • Cervical Cord Compression

    Gait changes - A positive Romberg test (the patient loses balance while standing with closed eyes and arms being stretched anteriorly) and abnormal findings during walking[symptoma.com] […] tests (heel-to-toe tandem walking, heel-walking, and toe-walking) are frequently observed.[symptoma.com]

  • Infantile-Onset Ascending Hereditary Spastic Paralysis

    At two years, neurological ex-amination revealed lower extremity spastic hypertonia withenhanced deep tendon reflexes, bilateral ankle clonus, andBabinski sign.[documents.tips] This manifests initially as stumbling, stubbing the toe, catching of the feet on uneven surfaces and sidewalks, clumsy gait, or difficulty with balance.[encyclopedia.com] Progressive difficulty walking is the main problem and occurs due to taut and weak muscles.[encyclopedia.com]

  • Paraparesis

    clonus and bilateral Babinski sign.[n.neurology.org] People with paraparesis tend to walk on the tips of their toes with their feet turned inward.[medicalnewstoday.com] Assessment of motor functions revealed mild lower limb spasticity, global and symmetrical muscle strength of 4/5 in lower extremities, hyperreflexia, ankle clonus, and bilateral[elsevier.es]

  • Autosomal Recessive Spastic Paraplegia Type 7

    ankle clonus and upgoing toes.[mdsabstracts.org] The deep tendon reflexes were increased in all four limbs, but Babinski sign was not elicited bilaterally. Neither ankle nor knee clonus was observed.[nature.com] He had ophthalmoplegia on both lateral gaze with mild upgaze restriction, increased tone in both lower limbs, ankle clonus, extensor plantar reflexes bilaterally, ataxic gait[neurologyindia.com]

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