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338 Possible Causes for Bilateral Babinski's Reflex, Inability to Supinate Forearm

  • Upper Motor Neuron Disease

    Dysdiadochokinesia refers to the inability of cerebellar patients to perform rapidly alternating movements, such as rapidly pronating and supinating the hands and forearms[nba.uth.tmc.edu] Bilateral upper and lower limb weakness with increased bilateral upper limb reflexes and Babinski reflexes were found.[bmcneurol.biomedcentral.com] , Babinski Decreased or absent: hyporeflexia, cutaneous reflexes decreased or absent Involuntary movements Muscle spasms: flexor or extensor With denervation: fasciculations[physiotherapy-treatment.com]

  • Brain Stem Disorder

    Dysdiadochokinesia refers to the inability of cerebellar patients to perform rapidly alternating movements, such as rapidly pronating and supinating the hands and forearms[nba.uth.tmc.edu]

  • Hypoglycemia

    An 84-year-old Japanese woman with metastatic insulinoma suffered from frequent hypoglycemic events. Continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) confirmed severe and frequent symptomatic/asymptomatic hypoglycemia. After the initiation of everolimus treatment, the hypoglycemic events were rapidly eliminated. CGM revealed[…][ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]

    Missing: Inability to Supinate Forearm
  • Hyponatremia

    Hyponatremia is defined as a serum sodium level of less than 135 mEq/L in a patient. Although hyponatremia is not an uncommon laboratory finding, especially in the elderly, hunting for the etiology is a challenging issue for any clinician. The three first-line investigations that are required for further analysis are[…][ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]

    Missing: Inability to Supinate Forearm
  • Carotid Stenosis

    Neurosurg Focus. 2011 Dec;31(6):E7. doi: 10.3171/2011.9.FOCUS11222. Author information 1 Department of Neurosurgery, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Rochester, Minnesota 55905, USA. Abstract Incidental findings pose considerable management dilemmas for the treating physician and psychological burden for the respective[…][ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]

    Missing: Inability to Supinate Forearm
  • Stroke

    The Rational Clinical Examination Clinician's Corner May 18, 2005 JAMA. 2005;293(19):2391-2402. doi:10.1001/jama.293.19.2391 Context Patients suspected of having a stroke or transient ischemic attack require accurate assessment for appropriate acute treatment and use of secondary preventive interventions. Objective[…][oadoi.org]

    Missing: Inability to Supinate Forearm
  • Cerebral Thrombosis

    In analyzing cerebral thrombosis at altitude--own case and in the literature--we anatomically confirmed that cerebral thrombi in mountain sickness were all of venous origin. All climbers went higher than 5,000 m and most stayed in that altitude longer than 3 weeks. Hemoconcentration was confirmed in two cases,[…][ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]

    Missing: Inability to Supinate Forearm
  • Anterior Cerebral Artery Occlusion

    Interv Neuroradiol. 2017 Aug;23(4):416-421. doi: 10.1177/1591019917702521. Epub 2017 Apr 26. Author information 1 1 Radiology, Chonbuk National University Medical School and Hospital, Republic of Korea. 2 2 Research Institute of Clinical Medicine of Chonbuk National University-Biomedical Research Institute of Chonbuk National[…][ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]

    Missing: Inability to Supinate Forearm
  • Pallidopyramidal Syndrome

    , bilateral Babinski reflex Good Blood tests, comprehensive of calcium and phosphate, were normal.[bmcneurol.biomedcentral.com] Progressive, severe: memory, orientation, attention (MMSE 19.5/30) Depression Early (diffuse hypertonia, resting and intentional tremor, gait disturbances) Inexhaustible glabellar reflex[bmcneurol.biomedcentral.com]

    Missing: Inability to Supinate Forearm
  • Primary Progressive Multiple Sclerosis

    We present three patients with a clinical course and cerebrospinal fluid findings consistent with a diagnosis of primary progressive multiple sclerosis (PPMS). Extensive and repeated magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) examinations showed only diffuse abnormality in brain and spinal cord, but no focal lesions. We propose[…][ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]

    Missing: Inability to Supinate Forearm

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