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429 Possible Causes for Black Stools, Sudden Death

  • Esophageal Varices

    Ballooning of blood vessels (veins) may cause vessels to rupture causing: vomiting of blood, tarry black stools.[quizlet.com] PROGNOSIS AND TREATMENT CHARACTERIZATION PROGNOSTIC FACTORS SUDDEN DEATH Esophageal variceal hemorrhage presenting as sudden death in outpatients. Tsokos M, Turk EE.[thedoctorsdoctor.com] A 58-year-old man with hepatitis B cirrhosis noticed black stools and underwent an endoscopy at a community hospital.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]

  • Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation

    stools Blood in the urine Vaginal bleeding Unexplained bruises Severe abdominal or back pain Seizures or loss of consciousness in advanced cases (rare) Nausea Difficulty[healthcommunities.com] Hemorrhage into the central nervous system may cause acute onset of neurological dysfunction or sudden death.[addl.purdue.edu] Intravascular Coagulation Abnormal bleeding from anywhere in the body, possibly at several sites at once Tiny, red, pinpointlike dots (petechiae) Vomiting of blood Bloody or black[healthcommunities.com]

  • Mercury Poisoning

    Sensitivity reactions to these diuretics may cause asthma, hives, other skin lesions, and sudden death.[britannica.com]

  • Chronic Alcoholism

    Symptoms include vomiting blood, black stool, decreased blood pressure, increased heart rate and massive hemorrhage.[livestrong.com] death of traumatic or neurological origin.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov] Coronary heart disease is the most common type of heart disease and can lead to sudden death from a heart attack.[drinkaware.co.uk]

  • Upper Gastrointestinal Hemorrhage

    In the absence of hematemesis, an upper source for GI bleeding is likely in the presence of at least two factors among: black stool, age 50 years, and blood urea nitrogen[en.wikipedia.org] Diagnostic testing According to a study by Witting, the strongest predictors were of an upper GI bleed are black stool, age [6] [7] Out of 325 persons studied, seven (5%)[ipfs.io] Black stool that does not contain occult blood may result from ingestion of iron, bismuth, or various foods and should not be mistaken for melena.[merckmanuals.com]

  • Gastrointestinal Hemorrhage

    Tarry black stools indicate a bleeding source in the upper GI tract; bright red blood from the rectum usually indicates bleeding in the distal colon.[medical-dictionary.thefreedictionary.com] death associated with cocaine.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov] Although not all black stools represent melena, patients who report black stools are much more likely to have a UGIB source.[jamaevidence.mhmedical.com]

  • Castor Bean Poisoning

    […] collapse Death This plant ( Ricinus sp.) contains a highly toxic glycoprotein called ricin and ricicine, an alkaloid found in both the seeds and leaves.[petpoisonhelpline.com] Death can occur with even a very small ingestion of the beans. Poison type: plants Alternate names: Ricinus, seed, African Wonder tree, Euphorbiaceae[petpoisonhelpline.com] Common signs to watch for: Inappetanc Drooling Abdominal pain Vomiting Severe bloody diarrhea Abdominal straining Weakness Trembling Hypotension (drop in blood pressure) Sudden[petpoisonhelpline.com]

  • Rare Form of Salmonellosis

    Acute presentation Sudden death is common, possibly with a short period of lethargy or some diarrhea. Geographic incidence Worldwide.[vetstream.com]

  • Mallory-Weiss Syndrome

    These may include: abdominal pain vomiting up blood, which is called hematemesis involuntary retching bloody or black stools Blood in the vomit will usually be dark and clotted[healthline.com] , unexpected death.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov] […] unexpected death ( Arch Kriminol 2002;209:36 , Srp Arh Celok Lek 2001;129:257 , J Clin Pathol 1991;44:787 ) Boerhaave syndrome: esophageal rupture, usually lethal Etiology[pathologyoutlines.com]

  • Amanita Phalloides Poisoning

    Poison control officials in California usually get just a few cases of mushroom poisoning each year, so the sudden outbreak alarmed medical officials, according to the report[latimes.com] The ‘death cap’ Considered one of the world’s deadliest mushrooms, amanita phalloides produces a poisonous toxin that becomes volatile once it is absorbed in the gastrointestinal[latimes.com]

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