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123 Possible Causes for Central Sharp-and-Slow-Waves, Prominent High Nasal Root

  • Angelman Syndrome

    EEG patterns in AS may show runs of slow wave activity over the frontal areas of the brain and sharp waves in this same area.[epilepsy.com] nasal root. [5] The facial features are characteristic and include: Deep set eyes Strabismus Myopia Marked nasal root Broad and/or beaked nasal bridge Prominent Cupid's bow[en.wikipedia.org] Slowing may also be seen most in the central and temporal regions of the brain; the central regions are involved in motor and sensory functions.[epilepsy.com]

  • Wolf-Hirschhorn Syndrome

    Salient Features 3-7 Craniofacial : "Greek warrior helmet" appearance - broad nasal root continuing into the forehead.[genetics4medics.com] Microcephaly, hypertelorism, prominent glabella, high arched eyebrows, broad nose, short philtrum, downturned corners of the mouth, dysplastic ears with pits/tags.[genetics4medics.com]

  • Epilepsy

    wave located in the right central-parietal lobe.[dovepress.com] EEG at 11 months showed right central high voltage slowing and sharp waves, and at 2.5 years, was unremarkable.[brain.oxfordjournals.org] However, after several examinations of the scalp video-EEG, his EEG showed a time-locked abnormal discharge synchronized to the rhythmic jerk ( Figure 1 ), seen as a sharp-slow[dovepress.com]

    Missing: Prominent High Nasal Root
  • Early Infantile Epileptic Encephalopathy Type 17

    EEG at 11 months showed right central high voltage slowing and sharp waves, and at 2.5 years, was unremarkable.[dx.doi.org]

    Missing: Prominent High Nasal Root
  • Panayiotopoulos Syndrome

    The electroencephalogram manifestations are severe with long runs of high amplitude occipital sharp and slow waves.[adc.bmj.com] Although called centrotemporal spikes, these are mainly high amplitude sharp and slow wave complexes localised in the C3/C4 (high central) in 30 % of patients and C5/C6 (low[omicsonline.org] Despite their name, these are usually high amplitude sharp- and slow-wave complexes localized to the central (C3/C4) electrodes or midway between the central and temporal[demosmedical.com]

    Missing: Prominent High Nasal Root
  • Rolandic Epilepsy

    Although called centrotemporal spikes, these are mainly high amplitude sharp and slow wave complexes localised in the C3/C4 (high central) in 30 % of patients and C5/C6 (low[omicsonline.org] The interictal EEG in Panayiotopoulos syndrome commonly reveals functional, mainly multifocal, high-amplitude sharp- and slow-wave complexes, with great variability at various[emedicine.com] It is important to perform a wake–sleep EEG because the spike-wave discharges are activated as the patient enters the sleep phase of the study.[omicsonline.org]

    Missing: Prominent High Nasal Root
  • Brain Neoplasm

    RATIONALE AND OBJECTIVES: To compare differences in diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and dynamic susceptibility-weighted contrast-enhanced (DSC) magnetic resonance (MR) perfusion imaging characteristics of recurrent neoplasm and radiation necrosis in patients with brain tumors previously treated with radiotherapy[…][ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]

    Missing: Prominent High Nasal Root
  • Early Infantile Epileptic Encephalopathy Type 3

    Inter-ictally, clusters of sharp-slow wave focal discharges maximum around the left Rolandic regions (left). They became continuous during natural sleep (right).[slideshare.net] Ictal discharge starts from the left central regions and rapidly spreads to the neighbouring regions.[slideshare.net]

    Missing: Prominent High Nasal Root
  • Creutzfeldt Jakob Disease

    Sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (sCJD) mainly occurs in the elderly, with the peak age of onset ranging from 55 to 75 years. The symptoms of sCJD are not unique, and laboratory tests such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), electroencephalogram (EEG) and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF)14-3-3 protein have low[…][ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]

    Missing: Prominent High Nasal Root
  • Lennox-Gastaut Syndrome

    Review Article First Online: 09 November 2017 Abstract Lennox-Gastaut syndrome (LGS) is considered an epileptic encephalopathy and is defined by a triad of multiple drug-resistant seizure types, a specific EEG pattern showing bursts of slow spike-wave complexes or generalized paroxysmal fast activity, and[…][doi.org]

    Missing: Prominent High Nasal Root

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