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491 Possible Causes for Cerebellar Gait Ataxia

  • Autosomal Recessive Spastic Paraplegia Type 58

    This preeminent book in the field of Neurology has been extensively updated and expanded by 70 leading authorities, providing a single, encyclopedic summary the scientific advances and new clinical practices that can be immediately considered for your patients. It brings together nearly the entire spectrum of motor[…][books.google.de]

  • Cerebellar Ataxia

    A 45-year-old man with a cerebellar gait ataxia, dysmetria, nystagmus and mild cerebellar dysarthria was diagnosed with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus a year after the[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov] ) gait item as the most valid and responsive measures of gait in cerebellar ataxia.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov] […] aims to identify the gait characteristics able to differentiate between Cerebellar Ataxia and healthy controls.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]

  • Acute Cerebellar Ataxia

    Truncal ataxia with deterioration of gait Slurred speech and nystagmus Afebrile Possible causes of acute cerebellar ataxia include varicella infection, as well as infection[en.wikipedia.org] Acute cerebellar ataxia is a clinical syndrome with sudden onset of uncoordinated gait and normal mental status in young children.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov] AIM: Acute cerebellar ataxia (ACA, sudden onset of truncal ataxia and gait disturbances) usually follows a benign illness (25% varicella).[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]

  • Spinocerebellar Ataxia Type 13

    gait ataxia associated with cerebellar dysarthria and often accompanied by mild intellectual disability and occasional seizures to adult-onset progressive ataxia.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov] The patients-seven women and a 4-year-old boy-exhibited slowly progressive childhood-onset cerebellar gait ataxia associated with cerebellar dysarthria, moderate mental retardation[childnervoussystem.blogspot.com] In the families described to date, the phenotype of spinocerebellar ataxia type 13 (SCA13) has ranged from slowly progressive childhood-onset cerebellar gait ataxia associated[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]

  • Ataxia

    Marsden, Cerebellar ataxia, Balance, Gait, and Falls, 10.1016/B978-0-444-63916-5.00017-3, (261-281), (2018).[doi.org] See Cerebellar gait, Friedreich's ataxia, Hereditary cerebellar ataxia, Spinocerebellar ataxia Vox populi Wobbling. a·tax·i·a ( ă-taksē-ă ) An inability to coordinate muscle[medical-dictionary.thefreedictionary.com] […] peduncles, the pons or the red nucleus Because the cerebellum is responsible for synchronising voluntary muscle movement throughout the body, cerebellar ataxia can result[mult-sclerosis.org]

  • Chronic Alcoholism

    The cause of the alcoholic gait is brain damage called alcoholic cerebellar ataxia.[promises.com] Both balance and gait are compromised. Can an Alcoholic Recover from Cerebellar Ataxia?[promises.com] However, long-term alcoholics frequently develop cerebellar ataxia. It’s called cerebellar ataxia, because it affects a part of the brain called the cerebellum.[promises.com]

  • Neuropathy

    All patients have gait ataxia and the majority have lower limb ataxia.[doi.org] GA is usually of insidious onset; however, it can also be rapidly progressive mimicking paraneoplastic cerebellar degeneration. Gaze-evoked nystagmus is common.[doi.org]

  • Toxoplasmosis

    The authors report one rare case in a 50-year-old HIV-infected male patient who presented with clipped speech, gait ataxia and incoordination.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov] Abstract Isolated cerebellar mass lesion is an uncommon presentation of toxoplasmosis.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov] The cerebellar toxoplasmosis was suspected based on imaging findings, despite the atypical location.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]

  • Restless Legs Syndrome

    All patients have gait ataxia and the majority have lower limb ataxia.[dx.doi.org] GA is usually of insidious onset; however, it can also be rapidly progressive mimicking paraneoplastic cerebellar degeneration. Gaze-evoked nystagmus is common.[dx.doi.org]

  • Peripheral Neuropathy

    All patients have gait ataxia and the majority have lower limb ataxia.[doi.org] GA is usually of insidious onset; however, it can also be rapidly progressive mimicking paraneoplastic cerebellar degeneration. Gaze-evoked nystagmus is common.[doi.org]

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