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30 Possible Causes for Cerebellar Gait Ataxia, Nocturnal Leg Cramp

  • Restless Legs Syndrome

    All patients have gait ataxia and the majority have lower limb ataxia.[dx.doi.org] Two common causes of pain or discomfort in legs are nocturnal leg cramps (NLC) and restless leg syndrome (RLS).[doi.org] Leg pain and discomfort are common complaints in any primary physician's clinic.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]

  • Chronic Alcoholism

    The cause of the alcoholic gait is brain damage called alcoholic cerebellar ataxia.[promises.com] Both balance and gait are compromised. Can an Alcoholic Recover from Cerebellar Ataxia?[promises.com] However, long-term alcoholics frequently develop cerebellar ataxia. It’s called cerebellar ataxia, because it affects a part of the brain called the cerebellum.[promises.com]

  • Peripheral Neuropathy

    All patients have gait ataxia and the majority have lower limb ataxia.[doi.org] GA is usually of insidious onset; however, it can also be rapidly progressive mimicking paraneoplastic cerebellar degeneration. Gaze-evoked nystagmus is common.[doi.org]

  • Pernicious Anemia

    It causes ataxia of stance and gait with relative sparing of the arms. It has an insidious onset and a subacute or chronic course.[neuropathology-web.org] Midline cerebellar degeneration (also referred to as alcoholic cerebellar degeneration) is a component of WKS, but may also occur alone.[neuropathology-web.org]

  • Alcoholic Neuropathy

    Some people may experience frequent falls and gait unsteadiness due to ataxia.[en.wikipedia.org] Limb or gait ataxia was prominent in 3 patients. Ataxia was of sensory type, and 1 patient additionally showed features of cerebellar ataxia.[jamanetwork.com] This ataxia may be caused by cerebellar degeneration, sensory ataxia, or distal muscle weakness.[en.wikipedia.org]

  • Spastic Paraplegia

    Main inclusion criteria for HA were cerebellar gait and/or limb ataxia, and for HSP, spasticity in the lower limbs, brisk reflexes and positive Babinski sign [ 11, 12 ].[journals.plos.org] gait.[nature.com] Abstract Background: Hereditary cerebellar ataxias (HCA) and hereditary spastic paraplegias (HSP) are two groups of neurodegenerative disorders that usually present with progressive[karger.com]

  • Nocturnal Myoclonus Syndrome

    Other abnormal movements that may be confused with nocturnal myoclonus are the startles of hyperekplexia, the syndrome of painful legs and moving toes, nocturnal leg cramps[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov] EA2 is characterised by periods of cerebellar ataxia lasting minutes to hours, which are triggered by physical and emotional stress.[epilepsydiagnosis.org] Periodic limb movement disorder (PLMD), is a condition in which a person’s legs or arms twitch, cramp or move involuntarily and periodically during sleep.[nativeremedies.com]

  • Muscular Fasciculation

    Nocturnal leg cramps are involuntary muscle contractions that occur typically in the leg muscles at night or during rest.[spine.org] There are two major forms of cerebellar ataxia. Disturbances of posture or gait result from lesions to the vestibulocerebellum .[nba.uth.tmc.edu] Cerebellar ataxia is fairly easy to observe in the office and it has at least two origins: (1) intention tremor of the legs, giving a dysmetric gait, and (2) truncal imbalance[dartmouth.edu]

  • Myoclonic Jerking

    EA2 is characterised by periods of cerebellar ataxia lasting minutes to hours, which are triggered by physical and emotional stress.[epilepsydiagnosis.org] Nocturnal leg cramps are difficult to control and treat.[medicinenet.com] Gait and upper limb ataxia may be accompanied by dysarthria, nystagmus, vertigo, nausea and headache.[epilepsydiagnosis.org]

  • GLUT1 Deficiency Syndrome

    Clinical findings included the following: Gait disturbance (89%), the most frequent being ataxia and spasticity together or ataxia alone Action limb dystonia (86%) Mild chorea[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov] Moreover, many different movement disorders, including ataxia and intention tremor, dystonia, chorea, spasticity, myoclonus and nocturnal painful muscle cramps in the legs[jnnp.bmj.com] (75%) Cerebellar action tremor (70%) Non-epileptic paroxysmal events (28%) Dyspraxia (21%) Myoclonus (16%) The 40 individuals on a ketogenic diet had less severe gait disturbances[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]

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