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426 Possible Causes for Cerebral Toxoplasmosis, Episodic Pain and Paresthesia in the Extremities

  • Fabry Disease

    Fabry disease (MIM 301500) is an X-linked recessive lysosomal storage disorder resulting from deficient α-galactosidase A (α-Gal A) activity. It has been estimated that this disease affects 1 in 50 000 males in the general population. 1,2 α-Gal A is an enzyme involved in the metabolic breakdown of globotriaosylceramide[…][tools.wmflabs.org]

  • Toxoplasmosis

    Diagnostic Confirmation: Are you sure your patient has cerebral toxoplasmosis?[clinicaladvisor.com] […] of cerebral toxoplasmosis is extremely rare in immunocompetent persons.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov] MRI has an essential role in the differentiation of the cerebral lesions. A variety of MRI patterns have been described in cerebral toxoplasmosis.[emedicine.medscape.com]

    Missing: Episodic Pain and Paresthesia in the Extremities
  • HIV Infection

    […] serology can make either PCNSL or cerebral toxoplasmosis more or less likely.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov] toxoplasmosis Table 3.[aafp.org] Differential diagnosis includes other oncologic or infectious causes, with cerebral toxoplasmosis being the most important.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]

    Missing: Episodic Pain and Paresthesia in the Extremities
  • Disseminated Toxoplasmosis

    Abstract Cerebral toxoplasmosis is the most common cause of focal brain disease in patients with the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov] A Report of Two Cases of Cerebral Toxoplasmosis in Leukemia Patients, Jundishapur J Microbiol. 2013 ; 6(10):e8906. doi: 10.5812/jjm.8906.[jjmicrobiol.com] Lesions indicative of cerebral toxoplasmosis were visualized on cranial computerized tomography in only 3/10 evaluated patients.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]

    Missing: Episodic Pain and Paresthesia in the Extremities
  • Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome

    A case of Holmes tremor secondary to cerebral toxoplasmosis in an AIDS patient is presented.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov] toxoplasmosis.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov] toxoplasmosis, recurrent pneumonias and severe infections by Salmonella spp.[symptoma.com]

    Missing: Episodic Pain and Paresthesia in the Extremities
  • HIV-2 Infection

    For example, conditions such as tuberculosis, esophageal candidiasis, wasting syndrome, cerebral toxoplasmosis, disseminated Mycobacterium avium intracellulare , cryptococcosis[cid.oxfordjournals.org]

    Missing: Episodic Pain and Paresthesia in the Extremities
  • Congenital Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome

    Fungal infections - Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia (PCP), candidiasis (esophageal or pulmonary), cryptococcosis, histoplasmosis (extrapulmonary), cerebral toxoplasmosis[symptoma.com] N Engl J Med 290:1110, 1974 Diebler C, Dusser A, Dulac 0: Congenital toxoplasmosis. Clinical and neuroradiological evaluation of the cerebral lesions.[isradiology.org] Neuroradiology 27:125-130, 1985 Dina TS: Primary central nervous system lymphoma versus toxoplasmosis in AIDS.[isradiology.org]

    Missing: Episodic Pain and Paresthesia in the Extremities
  • Acute Lymphadenopathic Toxoplasmosis

    cerebral toxoplasmosis (95% CI 3.72 to 31.2).[nature.com] Blood may not be a sensitive specimen for detecting organ specific disease (eg, ocular or cerebral toxoplasmosis).[mayomedicallaboratories.com] Leukemia & Lymphoma 53(8): 1481-1487, 2012 Cerebral toxoplasmosis in a patient with Hodgkin's disease .[eurekamag.com]

    Missing: Episodic Pain and Paresthesia in the Extremities
  • Cerebral Toxoplasmosis

    Movement disorders occur in some patients with cerebral toxoplasmosis with HIV-1 infection.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov] A 47-year-old patient with AIDS and cerebral toxoplasmosis was treated with sulfadiazine pyrimethamine for 5 days.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov] This is a case of HIV infection with cerebral toxoplasmosis. Cerebral toxoplasmosis is an AIDS- related infection and is one of the causes of CNS mass lesions in AIDS.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]

    Missing: Episodic Pain and Paresthesia in the Extremities
  • Hemiballismus

    Abstract A young woman had hemichorea-hemiballismus subsequently found to be secondary to a cerebral toxoplasmosis infection complicating human immunodeficiency virus infection[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov] The most common infection which causes hemiballismus is cerebral toxoplasmosis. The lesions of this infection are most often found in the basal ganglia.[epainassist.com] The presence of hemichorea-hemiballismus in a young patient should suggest a diagnosis of AIDS and in particular the diagnosis of secondary cerebral toxoplasmosis.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]

    Missing: Episodic Pain and Paresthesia in the Extremities

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