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26 Possible Causes for Cholelithiasis, Edema, Physiological Neonatal Jaundice

  • Obesity

    Edema Edema (American English), oedema or œdema (British English), formerly known as dropsy or hydropsy, is the increase of interstitial fluid in any organ — swelling.[empoweryourhealth.org] […] tolerance, acanthosis nigricans, hepatic steatosis, premature puberty, hypogonadism and polycystic ovary syndrome, obstructive sleep disorder, orthopedic complications, cholelithiasis[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov] […] effects of infection and, in one case, neonatal death.[doi.org]

  • Liver Cirrhosis

    RESULTS: Villous edema was observed in 131 patients (36%), and severe lesions were found in 71 (20%).[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov] […] history of alcohol excess, neonatal jaundice, hypertension, or hypercholesterolemia.[atsjournals.org] After therapy, CE findings among the 24 cases were as follows: villous edema (19 cases); erythema (17 cases); angioectasia (16 cases); erosions (12 cases); and EVs (9 cases[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]

  • Cardiac Cirrhosis

    Edema Edema typically occurs in the lower extremities and dependent regions, which may progress to anasarca in cases of advanced and untreated heart failure.[emedicine.medscape.com] Postcholecystectomy syndrome Bile duct / other biliary tree Cholangitis ( PSC, Ascending ) · Cholestasis / Mirizzi's syndrome · Biliary fistula · Haemobilia · Gallstones / Cholelithiasis[wikidoc.org] Physiological neonatal jaundice (we will see this in another chapter). Enzyme deficiencies. E.g. Glucose 6 phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency. Impaired liver function.[mediktor.com]

  • Hereditary Spherocytosis

    An infected fetus can have severe anemia, congestive heart failure, generalized edema (fetal hydrops) and even death.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov] This is a report of an 11 years old male diagnosed case of hereditary spherocytosis who presented with jaundice, splenomegaly and cholelithiasis.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov] Applicable To Neonatal physiological jaundice (intense)(prolonged) NOS spherocytosis D58.0 (congenital) Spherocytosis (congenital) (familial) (hereditary) D58.0 hemoglobin[icd10data.com]

  • Indian Childhood Cirrhosis

    Affected individuals can experience fatigue, weakness, loss of appetite, weight loss, nausea, swelling (edema), enlarged blood vessels, and yellowing of the skin and whites[icdlist.com] […] vascular occlusion resulting in tissue ischemia and acute and chronic organ dysfunction; complications include anemia, jaundice, predisposition to aplastic crisis, sepsis, cholelithiasis[animals-partner.blogspot.com] It typically presents with transient neonatal jaundice, in a child who is otherwise healthy, and progresses to biliary cirrhosis and portal hypertension.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]

  • Extrahepatic Cholestasis

    […] obliteration of major hepatic duct lumina or common bile duct Microscopic (histologic) description Early: Obstructive changes with ductular proliferation, variable portal edema[pathologyoutlines.com] Instead, the increased surface density of the mitochondrial cristae, which has also been previously reported in patients with uncomplicated cholelithiasis, appears as an early[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov] Whereas physiologic jaundice constitutes a common finding in neonates, a few cases present with cholestatic jaundice owing to various pathologic conditions, including extrahepatic[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]

  • Transient Familial Neonatal Hyperbilirubinemia

    EYES Marked lid edema often results in eversion of the upper lid when force is applied to open the eye. Examination should be postponed until the edema resolves.[aafp.org] A Greek study of 198 adult patients with cholelithiasis, along with 152 controls, also found evidence of an association between Gilbert syndrome and the development of cholelithiasis[emedicine.medscape.com] Preferred Name Fetal and neonatal jaundice, NOS Synonyms Physiologic jaundice in newborn, NOS ID altLabel Physiologic jaundice in newborn, NOS Neonatal jaundice, NOS Foetal[purl.bioontology.org]

  • Pneumatosis Vaginalis

    Coronal (A) and sagi obstructed bowel with mesenteric edema (arrows).[docsity.com] Children with hemoglobinopathies or hemolytic diseases are at great risk for cholelithiasis.[elearning.sumdu.edu.ua] Crigler-Najjar syndrome B. jaundice due to parenteral nutrition C. neonatal hepatitis D. physiologic jaundice E. pyloric stenosis 27- Early hospital discharge is defined as[prep4usmle.com]

  • Jaundice

    Bilirubin enters the tissue fluids and is absorbed more readily at sites of inflammation and edema (abnormal accumulation of fluids in the tissues).[britannica.com] Clonorchis sinensis, the pathogen, is the major parasitic trigger contributing to cholangitis, cholelithiasis, and even cholangiocarcinoma.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov] This is called “physiologic” or normal neonatal jaundice. Most infants have this pattern so no testing is needed.[patients.gi.org]

  • Neonatal Hepatitis

    Clinical signs occur as early as 48 hours after birth and are characterized by the association of severe hepatocellular failure with hyperbilirubinemia, signs of hemorrhage, edema[orpha.net] Extrahepatic etiologies are extrahepatic biliary atresia choledochal cyst, bile duct stenosis, spontaneous perforation of the bile duct cholelithiasis, inspissated bile/mucus[youtube.com] Infants with this condition are usually jaundiced. Jaundice that is caused by neonatal hepatitis is not the same as physiologic neonatal jaundice.[en.wikipedia.org]

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