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14 Possible Causes for Cholelithiasis, Hemoglobin Decreased, Physiological Neonatal Jaundice

  • Hereditary Spherocytosis

    Applicable To Neonatal physiological jaundice (intense)(prolonged) NOS spherocytosis D58.0 (congenital) Spherocytosis (congenital) (familial) (hereditary) D58.0 hemoglobin[icd10data.com] All experienced an increase in hemoglobin and decrease in reticulocyte count early after LPS and at last follow-up. Twenty-two were sent for genetic analysis.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov] This is a report of an 11 years old male diagnosed case of hereditary spherocytosis who presented with jaundice, splenomegaly and cholelithiasis.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]

  • Liver Cirrhosis

    […] history of alcohol excess, neonatal jaundice, hypertension, or hypercholesterolemia.[atsjournals.org] There was no correlation between the presence of severe fibrosis or cirrhosis and other physiologic parameters of pulmonary function, age, family history of liver disease,[atsjournals.org]

  • Obesity

    […] effects of infection and, in one case, neonatal death.[doi.org] There was a trend toward a greater decrease in mean glycosylated hemoglobin values in diabetic subjects on the low-carbohydrate diet, as compared with those on the low-fat[dx.doi.org] […] tolerance, acanthosis nigricans, hepatic steatosis, premature puberty, hypogonadism and polycystic ovary syndrome, obstructive sleep disorder, orthopedic complications, cholelithiasis[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]

  • Cardiac Cirrhosis

    Physiological neonatal jaundice (we will see this in another chapter). Enzyme deficiencies. E.g. Glucose 6 phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency. Impaired liver function.[mediktor.com] There is decreased white blood cell count, hemoglobin level and hematocrit, albumin, or platelets.[nurseslabs.com] Postcholecystectomy syndrome Bile duct / other biliary tree Cholangitis ( PSC, Ascending ) · Cholestasis / Mirizzi's syndrome · Biliary fistula · Haemobilia · Gallstones / Cholelithiasis[wikidoc.org]

  • Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome

    Other serious events included birth‐related conditions (14 with ZDV versus 6 with NVP), physiological jaundice (10 with ZDV versus 5 with NVP) and neonatal septicaemia (7[doi.org] Introduction Thalassemia is a general term for a group of congenital, genetic disorders characterized by low levels of hemoglobin, decreased red blood cell production, and[rarediseases.org] This affects hemoglobin and decreases the ability of red blood cells to transport oxygen around the body.[kidshealth.org]

  • Gilbert Syndrome

    In Short : Those with Gilbert's Syndrome have increased hemolysis (breaking open of red blood cells) as well as decreased UGT1A1 activity.[gilbertssyndrome.com] […] for gallstone formation, there are reasons for postulating that the association of this common inherited disorder of hepatic bilirubin metabolism with HS could increase cholelithiasis[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov] jaundice, unspecified 2016 2017 2018 2019 Billable/Specific Code Code on Newborn Record Applicable To Neonatal physiological jaundice (intense)(prolonged) NOS due to or associated[icd10data.com]

  • Transient Familial Neonatal Hyperbilirubinemia

    Preferred Name Fetal and neonatal jaundice, NOS Synonyms Physiologic jaundice in newborn, NOS ID altLabel Physiologic jaundice in newborn, NOS Neonatal jaundice, NOS Foetal[purl.bioontology.org] Newborns are particularly susceptible to developing hyperbilirubinemia as they have increased bilirubin synthesis (secondary to elevated hemoglobin concentrations and shorter[nature.com] A Greek study of 198 adult patients with cholelithiasis, along with 152 controls, also found evidence of an association between Gilbert syndrome and the development of cholelithiasis[emedicine.medscape.com]

  • Jaundice

    […] in hemoglobin (11.6 g/dL to 9.7 g/dL) were then increased again in line with clinical improvement of malaria (HGB 11.4 g/dL), but unfortunately the evidence of hemolysis[omicsonline.org] Clonorchis sinensis, the pathogen, is the major parasitic trigger contributing to cholangitis, cholelithiasis, and even cholangiocarcinoma.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov] This is called “physiologic” or normal neonatal jaundice. Most infants have this pattern so no testing is needed.[patients.gi.org]

  • Splenic Hematoma

    We report a five-days-old female infant with neonatal jaundice secondary to splenic hematoma.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov] During the CT-scan the patient became unstable and the hemoglobin decreased.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov] We report an unusual case of urgent splenectomy for a ruptured subcapsular hematoma twelve hours after elective LC for cholelithiasis.[bmcsurg.biomedcentral.com]

  • Rotor Syndrome

    Neonatal jaundice and Breast-milk jaundice Conjugated hyperbilirubinaemia Hepatocellular – Diminished hepatocyte function.[lifeinthefastlane.com] Newborns are particularly susceptible to developing hyperbilirubinemia as they have increased bilirubin synthesis (secondary to elevated hemoglobin concentrations and shorter[nature.com] […] hemolytic jaundice, prehepatic jaundice, hepatic jaundice, posthepatic jaundice, obstructive jaundice, wilson's disease, hepatitis virus B, hepatitis virus C, HBV, HCV, Cholelithiasis[slideshare.net]

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