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29 Possible Causes for Cholelithiasis, Neonatal Hyperbilirubinemia, Physiological Neonatal Jaundice

  • Hereditary Spherocytosis

    neonatal hyperbilirubinemia.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov] Applicable To Neonatal physiological jaundice (intense)(prolonged) NOS spherocytosis D58.0 (congenital) Spherocytosis (congenital) (familial) (hereditary) D58.0 hemoglobin[icd10data.com] This is a report of an 11 years old male diagnosed case of hereditary spherocytosis who presented with jaundice, splenomegaly and cholelithiasis.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]

  • Crigler-Najjar Syndrome Type 1

    A neonatal hyperbilirubinemia resolved spontaneously.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov] Physiological neonatal jaundice may peak at 85–170 µmol/l and decline to normal adult concentrations within two weeks. Prematurity results in higher levels.[en.wikipedia.org] A Greek study of 198 adult patients with cholelithiasis, along with 152 controls, also found evidence of an association between Gilbert syndrome and the development of cholelithiasis[emedicine.com]

  • Gilbert Syndrome

    Sukru Aynacioglu, Reinhold Kerb, Murat Yurdakok and Atila Bozkurt, Neonatal Jaundice and Bilirubin UDP‐Glucuronosyl Transferase 1A1 Gene Polymorphism in Turkish Patients,[doi.org] […] for gallstone formation, there are reasons for postulating that the association of this common inherited disorder of hepatic bilirubin metabolism with HS could increase cholelithiasis[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov] jaundice, unspecified 2016 2017 2018 2019 Billable/Specific Code Code on Newborn Record Applicable To Neonatal physiological jaundice (intense)(prolonged) NOS due to or associated[icd10data.com]

  • Transient Familial Neonatal Hyperbilirubinemia

    ARIAS IM et al. (1965) TRANSIENT FAMILIAL NEONATAL HYPERBILIRUBINEMIA. [ ] 8.[moldiag.com] Preferred Name Fetal and neonatal jaundice, NOS Synonyms Physiologic jaundice in newborn, NOS ID altLabel Physiologic jaundice in newborn, NOS Neonatal jaundice, NOS Foetal[purl.bioontology.org] A Greek study of 198 adult patients with cholelithiasis, along with 152 controls, also found evidence of an association between Gilbert syndrome and the development of cholelithiasis[emedicine.medscape.com]

  • Neonatal Hepatitis

    Neonatal jaundice first becomes visible in the face and forehead. Blanching reveals the underlying colour.[patient.info] Extrahepatic etiologies are extrahepatic biliary atresia choledochal cyst, bile duct stenosis, spontaneous perforation of the bile duct cholelithiasis, inspissated bile/mucus[youtube.com] Infants with this condition are usually jaundiced. Jaundice that is caused by neonatal hepatitis is not the same as physiologic neonatal jaundice.[en.wikipedia.org]

  • Jaundice

    These infants, when starved and/or dehydrated, could probably be at high risk of bilirubin encephalopathy. newborn infant hyperbilirubinemia neonatal jaundice Neonatal jaundice[doi.org] Clonorchis sinensis, the pathogen, is the major parasitic trigger contributing to cholangitis, cholelithiasis, and even cholangiocarcinoma.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov] This is called “physiologic” or normal neonatal jaundice. Most infants have this pattern so no testing is needed.[patients.gi.org]

  • Rotor Syndrome

    A biliblanket is a portable phototherapy device for the treatment of neonatal jaundice ( hyperbilirubinemia ).[diki.pl] Neonatal jaundice and Breast-milk jaundice Conjugated hyperbilirubinaemia Hepatocellular – Diminished hepatocyte function.[lifeinthefastlane.com] […] hemolytic jaundice, prehepatic jaundice, hepatic jaundice, posthepatic jaundice, obstructive jaundice, wilson's disease, hepatitis virus B, hepatitis virus C, HBV, HCV, Cholelithiasis[slideshare.net]

  • Liver Cirrhosis

    A total of 5.3% had a family history of liver disease and 10.5% reported neonatal jaundice.[atsjournals.org] NN haemol haemolytic disease and other neonatal jaundice. Oth NN other neonatal disorders. PEM protein-energy malnutrition. Iodine iodine deficiency.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov] jaundice, mesothelioma, unintentional suffocation, pulmonary aspiration and foreign body in trachea or lung, and foreign body in other part of body.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]

  • Cardiac Cirrhosis

    Physiological neonatal jaundice (we will see this in another chapter). Enzyme deficiencies. E.g. Glucose 6 phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency. Impaired liver function.[mediktor.com] Postcholecystectomy syndrome Bile duct / other biliary tree Cholangitis ( PSC, Ascending ) · Cholestasis / Mirizzi's syndrome · Biliary fistula · Haemobilia · Gallstones / Cholelithiasis[wikidoc.org] Physiological neonatal jaundice (we will see this in another chapter). Enzyme deficiencies. E.g. Glucose 6 phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency. Impaired liver function.[mediktor.com]

  • Biliary Atresia

    Issues that should raise your concern: Prolonged neonatal jaundice Physiologic jaundice in healthy, full-term newborns typically resolves by the 5th or 6th day.[pedemmorsels.com] Differential diagnosis Other causes of obstructive jaundice - choledochal cyst, cholelithiasis and spontaneous perforation of the bile duct can all occur in the neonatal period[patient.info] ., glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, other hemoglobinopathies, physiological jaundice, impaired transport of bilirubin, hypoxia, acidosis, drugs (e.g., sulfonamides, aminosalicylic[surgery4children.com]

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