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278 Possible Causes for Claustrophobia

  • Temporal Lobe Epilepsy

    This site uses cookies, tags, and tracking settings to store information that help give you the very best browsing experience. Dismiss this warning View More View Less 1 Departments of Neurosurgery, Neurology, and Pathology, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut Restricted access Rhoton Anatomy[…][dx.doi.org]

  • Phobia

    Among the more common examples are acrophobia, fear of high places; claustrophobia, fear of closed places; nyctophobia, fear of the dark; ochlophobia, fear of crowds; xenophobia[britannica.com] Examples include: claustrophobia (small spaces), acrophobia (heights), and arachnophobia (spiders).[web.archive.org] Agoraphobia is a fear of public places, and claustrophobia is a fear of closed-in places.[nlm.nih.gov]

  • Temporomandibular Joint Disorder

    MRI has the problem of artefacts caused by metal or body motion and is also incompatible for patients with claustrophobia.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov] Relative disadvantages of MRI compared with CT scanning include the high initial cost of the scanner, the fact that MRI is not widely available, the presence of claustrophobia[emedicine.com] As she had claustrophobia and a reaction to iodine, air contrast arthrography and pumping manipulation therapy using limited cone beam computed tomography for dental use ([ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]

  • Menopause

    […] night sweats: Hot flashes can strike once a day, or up to 20 times or more, causing intense flashes of heat along with increased heart rate, dizziness, headache and even claustrophobia[womentowomen.com]

  • Neurotic Disorder

    […] specified situation or object to a wider range of circumstances, it becomes akin to or identical with anxiety state, and should be classified as such (300.0) Agoraphobia Claustrophobia[centralx.com] Common symptoms of nervous disorders are obsessions (mental and motor) and phobias (e.g. arachnophobia, agoraphobia, claustrophobia).[sfnat.org.nz] […] object or situation leads to panic attack. acrophobia (fear of high places), zoophobia (fear of animals), xenophobia (fear of strangers), algophobia (fear of pain), and claustrophobia[rxpgonline.com]

  • Musculoskeletal Lower Back Pain

    Some newer MRI machines, called Open MRIs, are likely to be more comfortable for patients who experience claustrophobia. The procedure takes 30-60 minutes.[nynjcmd.com]

  • Anxiety Disorder

    Excessive fear of certain situations or things, such as heights (acrophobia), crowds (agoraphobia), confinement in close quarters (claustrophobia), or spiders (arachnophobia[health.harvard.edu] Anxiety is the main symptom of several conditions, including: panic disorder phobias , such as agoraphobia or claustrophobia post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) social anxiety[nhs.uk] A person who fears airplanes, elevators, tunnels, and bridges is usually considered to have Panic Disorder or claustrophobia.[anxietycoach.com]

  • Hyperventilation

    […] susceptible patients, even minor stresses can trigger the syndrome, which then tends to manifest with primarily psychiatric complaints (eg, fear of death, impending doom, or claustrophobia[emedicine.com]

  • Panic Attacks

    The fourth and final section offers practical tips and techniques for overcoming 5 common phobias - claustrophobia, social phobia, and the fears of flying, driving, and public[anxietycoach.com] […] smothering sensations Uncontrollable itching Tingling or numbness in the hands, face, feet or mouth (paresthesia) Hot/cold flashes Faintness Trembling or shaking feeling of claustrophobia[crystalinks.com]

  • Specific Phobia

    Convert to ICD-10-CM : 300.29 converts approximately to: 2015/16 ICD-10-CM F40.218 Other animal type phobia Or: 2015/16 ICD-10-CM F40.240 Claustrophobia Or: 2015/16 ICD-10[icd9data.com] The results of this neurophysiological monitoring are demonstrated in one patient suffering from claustrophobia.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov] Cognitive therapy is most helpful in claustrophobia, and blood-injury phobia is uniquely responsive to applied tension.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]

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