Create issue ticket

145 Possible Causes for Clubbed Finger, Congenital Digital Clubbing

  • Liver Cirrhosis

    […] become wider/thicker (clubbed fingers) hair loss swelling of the legs, ankles, feet (oedema) swelling of the abdomen (ascites) dark urine pale-coloured stools or very dark[britishlivertrust.org.uk] Cirrhosis signs, include jaundice, gynecomastia (up to one third of men), loss of axillary and pubic hair, ascites, and splenomegaly (due to portal hypertension), finger clubbing[symptoma.com] Finger clubbing. Dupuytren's contracture. Other signs include: Hepatomegaly and a nodular liver. Oedema. Gynaecomastia and male hair loss pattern.[patient.info]

  • Bronchogenic Carcinoma

    Finger clubbing (hypertrophic osteoarthropathy) can be found in all types of bronchogenic carcinoma.[lecturio.com] […] of fingers).[histopathology-india.net] Quantitation of digital clubbing children. Measurements of cast of the index fingers. Am ver Resp Dis 1971; 104:166-74 [ Links ] 14.[scielo.br]

  • Inflammatory Bowel Disease Type 1

    fingers and toes 0001217 Clubbing of fingers Clubbed fingers Clubbing (hands) Finger clubbing [ more ] 0100759 Glossitis Inflammation of the tongue Smooth swollen tongue[rarediseases.info.nih.gov] Clubbing of the fingers is also occasionally seen.[verywellhealth.com] Clubbing, a deformity of the ends of the fingers, may also be a result of Crohn's disease.[en.wikipedia.org]

  • Ulcerative Colitis

    , a deformity of the ends of the fingers Primary sclerosing cholangitis, a distinct disease that causes inflammation of the bile ducts Causes[edit] No direct causes for UC[en.wikipedia.org] […] lower extremities Pyoderma gangrenosum, which is a painful ulcerating lesion involving the skin Deep venous thrombosis and pulmonary embolism Autoimmune hemolytic anemia Clubbing[en.wikipedia.org]

  • Bacterial Endocarditis

    With prolonged infection, clubbing of the fingers may also occur.[rarediseases.org] Other clinical signs, such as dyspnea, cough, general body pain, lower extremity pain, and finger clubbing were detected in a few cases [1].[doi.org] Reddish-brown streaks (splinter hemorrhages) may occur under the nails of the fingers and toes, and small painful nodules may appear in the pads of the fingers or toes (Osler[rarediseases.org]

  • Bronchiectasis

    fingers, fever, and anemia in more advanced cases Prevention of Bronchiectasis Be sure children have been properly vaccinated against childhood diseases.[healthcommunities.com] Symptoms include a constant cough producing copious purulent sputum; hemoptysis; chronic sinusitis; clubbing of fingers; and persistent moist, coarse crackles.[medical-dictionary.thefreedictionary.com] Bad breath Fits of coughing brought on by a change in posture, such as lying down Frequent respiratory infections Abnormal chest sounds Fatigue Appetite loss, weight loss, clubbed[healthcommunities.com]

  • Lung Abscess

    Finger clubbing is present in one third of patients. Dental decay is common especially in alcoholics and children.[en.wikipedia.org] In patients with chronic abscess clubbing fingers can appear.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov] […] of the fingers Fatigue Bluish discoloration of the skin Lung Abscess Prevention Thorough dental hygiene should be pursued.[healthcommunities.com]

  • Asbestosis

    This lack of oxygen can cause the clubbing. Patients with mesothelioma may develop clubbed fingers, but it is more rare.[mesotheliomaguide.com] Some people also experience clubbing of the nails and fingers, and this is more common in those with asbestosis.[mesotheliomatreatmentcenters.org] Clubbed fingers and toes When the lungs deliver insufficient oxygen to the blood, a symptom called “clubbing” may arise.[asbestos.com]

  • Empyema

    Intern Med. 2015;54(24):3189-91. doi: 10.2169/internalmedicine.54.5084. Epub 2015 Dec 15. Author information 1 Department of Surgery, National Hospital Organization Ehime Medical Center, Japan. Abstract Percutaneous transhepatic gallbladder drainage (PTGBD) is an alternative to emergency laparoscopic cholecystectomy in[…][ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]

  • Congenital Heart Disease

    Congenital heart disease is the most common birth defect, and because of major advances in medical and surgical management, there are now more adults living with congenital heart disease (CHD) than children. Until recently, the cause of the majority of CHD was unknown. Advances in genomic technologies have[…][ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]

Further symptoms

Similar symptoms