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402 Possible Causes for Cryptococcal Meningitis

  • Diabetes Mellitus

    Also called: Diabetes mellitus, DM Summary Diabetes is a disease in which your blood glucose, or blood sugar, levels are too high. Glucose comes from the foods you eat. Insulin is a hormone that helps the glucose get into your cells to give them energy. With type 1 diabetes, your body does not make insulin. With type 2[…][nlm.nih.gov]

  • Chronic Kidney Insufficiency

    Chronic kidney insufficiency affects a significant number of individuals in the developed countries, particularly the United States. The progressive nature of the disease and a substantial reduction in the quality of life over the period of time are the primary reasons why an early diagnosis is crucial. Anemia,[…][symptoma.com]

  • Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    Homepage Rare diseases Search Search for a rare disease Non-Hodgkin lymphoma Disease definition Non-Hodgkin malignant lymphomas(NHL) is a heterogeneous group of malignant tumors of the lymphoid system. ORPHA:547 Synonym(s): NHL Prevalence: 1-5 / 10 000 Inheritance: - Age of onset: Adult ICD-10: - OMIM: 605027[…][orpha.net]

  • Meningitis

    AIDS-associated cryptococcal meningitis.[doi.org] There is no pathognomonic brain image of cryptococcal meningitis.[doi.org] As a consequence of the increase in HIV-associated cryptococcosis, there has been a shift in the epidemiology of meningitis; cryptococcal meningitis is now the leading cause[doi.org]

  • Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    Bacterial meningitis 1 Tuberculous meningitis 3 Cryptococcal meningitis 3 Encephalitis 4 Non‐inflammatory 13 0 (0) 7 (53.8) 7 (53.8) 7 (53.8) 1 (9.1) 9 (81.8) 3 (27.3) 4[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov] ) 10 (83.3) 7 (58.3) 6 (50) 1 (8.3) 7 (58.3) 4 (33.3) 5 (41.6) Central nervous system infection 11 3 (27.3) 7 (63.6) 4 (36.4) 4 (36.4) 2 (18.2) 8 (72.7) 1 (9.1) 3 (27.3) Meningitis[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]

  • Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia

    meningitis and pneumonia).[pubmedcentral.nih.gov] […] pneumonia (n   1, fatal); Herpes zoster (n   4 after study); pulmonary aspergillosis (n   1 after study, fatal); invasive aspergillosis; and Listeria meningitis (n   1, after[doi.org] ( hsv )], systemic Candida infections, mycobacterial reactivation, and invasive fungal infections (for example, pulmonary aspergillo-sis, rhinocerebral mucormycosis, and cryptococcal[pubmedcentral.nih.gov]

  • Fungal Meningitis

    RESULTS: Cryptococcal meningitis was the most prevalent type of fungal meningitis (70.1 % of cases over the duration of the study), followed by coccidioidomycosis (16.4 %)[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov] Twelve of them had cryptococcal meningitis while 3 were infected with Candida albicans.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov] From the common cryptococcal meningitis to the rare fungal meningitis caused by a dimorphic or filamentous fungus, medical issues are discussed in this review on a fungus-specific[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]

  • Sarcoidosis

    Radiographics. 2018 Jul-Aug;38(4):1180-1200. doi: 10.1148/rg.2018170157. Author information 1 From the Department of Radiology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Pickens Academic Tower, 1400 Pressler St, Unit 1473, Houston, TX 77030-4009 (D.G.); Department of Radiology, Mayo Clinic Arizona,[…][ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]

  • Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome

    Of 29 (64.4%) patients with cryptococcal meningitis, 23 died before week 2 on antifungal therapy, and the other six during the next 3 months.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov] Without treatment, they could also develop severe illnesses such as tuberculosis, cryptococcal meningitis, severe bacterial infections and cancers such as lymphomas and Kaposi's[who.int] At admission, most of the 45 patients with cryptococcal meningitis who died, presented more altered consciousness (P 0.0047), intracranial increased pressure (P 0.047), and[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]

  • Acute Myelocytic Leukemia

    History Patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) present with signs and symptoms resulting from bone marrow failure, organ infiltration with leukemic cells, or both. The time course is variable. Some patients, particularly younger ones, present with acute symptoms that develop over a few days to 1-2 weeks. Others[…][emedicine.medscape.com]

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