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24 Possible Causes for Dark Urine, Physiological Neonatal Jaundice, Yellow Discoloration of the Skin

  • Neonatal Jaundice

    Jaundice, Physiological NeonatalNeonatal Jaundice, Physiological — Severe Jaundice in Newborn — Severe Jaundice in Neonate — Icterus Gravis Neonatorum[mesh.kib.ki.se] In these disorders, the clinical presentation includes jaundice, pale stools, dark urine and hepatomegaly.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov] Definition Neonatal jaundice is the yellowing discoloration of the skin and sclera of a neonate, which is caused by increased levels of bilirubin in the blood.[bestpractice.bmj.com]

  • Physiological Neonatal Jaundice

    Published on Jul 10, 2016 Physiological Neonatal Jaundice and Its causes. Physiological Neonatal Jaundice 1. PHYSIOLOGICAL NEONATAL JAUNDICE 10/07/2016 1 2.[slideshare.net] Definition (MSH) Yellow discoloration of the SKIN; MUCOUS MEMBRANE; and SCLERA in the NEWBORN. It is a sign of NEONATAL HYPERBILIRUBINEMIA.[fpnotebook.com] […] becomes dark Baby unwell or feeding poorly Jaundice prolonged beyond 2 wks, for term, or 3 wks, for preterm babies b.[rch.org.au]

  • Jaundice

    This is called “physiologic” or normal neonatal jaundice. Most infants have this pattern so no testing is needed.[patients.gi.org] Jaundice is a yellow discoloration of the skin and mucous membranes caused by an excess accumulation of bilirubin in the blood.[medcomic.com] You may also have dark urine and pale stools.[healthline.com]

  • Extrahepatic Cholestasis

    Whereas physiologic jaundice constitutes a common finding in neonates, a few cases present with cholestatic jaundice owing to various pathologic conditions, including extrahepatic[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov] discoloration of the skin (jaundice), dark urine, and pale stools.[medical-dictionary.thefreedictionary.com] The biochemical derangement is reinforced by clinical symptoms and signs: pale stool - no bilirubin reaching gastrointestinal tract for conversion to stercobilin dark orange[gpnotebook.co.uk]

  • Neonatal Hepatitis

    Infants with this condition are usually jaundiced. Jaundice that is caused by neonatal hepatitis is not the same as physiologic neonatal jaundice.[en.wikipedia.org] The common symptoms include jaundice (yellow discoloration of the skin and the whites of the eyes) and hepatomegaly (liver enlargement).[biology-online.org] Case Report A male infant was brought by his parents at the age of 4 weeks because of yellow discoloration of skin and sclera which started in the second week of life.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]

  • Biliary Atresia

    Issues that should raise your concern: Prolonged neonatal jaundice Physiologic jaundice in healthy, full-term newborns typically resolves by the 5th or 6th day.[pedemmorsels.com] discoloration of the skin and whites of the eyes due to an abnormally high level of bilirubin (bile pigment) in the bloodstream, which is then excreted through the kidneys[beaumont.org] Other symptoms may include: Dark urine Enlarged spleen Floating stools Foul-smelling stools Pale or clay-colored stools Slow growth Slow or no weight gain The health care[nlm.nih.gov]

  • Indian Childhood Cirrhosis

    It typically presents with transient neonatal jaundice, in a child who is otherwise healthy, and progresses to biliary cirrhosis and portal hypertension.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov] Yellow discoloring of the skin, eye, and mucus membranes because of increased bilirubin (at least 2–3 mg/dL or 30 mmol/L). Urine may also appear dark. Asterixis .[gutenberg.us] The same bile pigment, bilirubin, which is responsible for the yellow skin tones of jaundice can turn urine dark.[chp.edu]

  • Breast Milk Jaundice

    neonatal jaundice is a diagnosis of exclusion![amboss.com] These may include: yellow discoloration of the skin and the whites of the eyes fatigue listlessness poor weight gain high-pitched crying Infants are born with high levels[healthline.com] […] becomes dark Baby unwell or feeding poorly Jaundice prolonged beyond 2 wks, for term, or 3 wks, for preterm babies b.[rch.org.au]

  • Crigler-Najjar Syndrome Type 1

    Physiological neonatal jaundice may peak at 85–170 µmol/l and decline to normal adult concentrations within two weeks. Prematurity results in higher levels.[en.wikipedia.org] This leads to jaundice, i.e. yellow discoloration of skin and eyes. Excess bilirubin can also damage the brain, muscles, and nerves.[medindia.net] This occurs in some infants with cholestatic jaundice and is manifested by a dark, grayish brown discoloration of the skin, serum, and urine.[emedicine.medscape.com]

  • Hypercarotinemia

    One of the most common types of jaundice is known as neonatal jaundice (also called physiological jaundice).[medfriendly.com] […] hi"per-kar" cah te ne' me-ah an excessive amount of carotene in the blood usually associated with a yellow discoloration of the skin. hy·per·car·o·te·ne·mi·a ( hīpĕr-kārŏ-tĕ-nēmē-ă[medical-dictionary.thefreedictionary.com] Carotenoderma is the presence of large amounts of carotene in the skin. Xanthoderma is a yellow discoloration of the skin of any cause.[healthhype.com]

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