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14 Possible Causes for Difficulty Raising Arms, Fainting Spells

  • Muscle Strain

    For example, in a full rotator cuff tear, it is often impossible to raise the arm over the head.[builtlean.com] Depending on the degree of the tear (i.e. partial/minor versus full), there will be varying levels of difficulty in moving the muscle.[builtlean.com]

  • Stroke

    Arm weakness. One arm will feel weak or numb. When asked to raise both arms, one of the person’s arms will drift downward. Speech difficulty.[saebo.com] Arm weakness Ask the person to raise both arms. Does one drift downward? Speech difficulty Is speech slurred or hard to understand?[everydayhealth.com] Arm weakness: If the person tries to raise both their arms, does one arm drift downward?[medicalnewstoday.com]

  • Hemorrhagic Stroke

    Arm weakness Ask the person to raise both arms. Does one drift downward? Speech difficulty Is speech slurred or hard to understand?[everydayhealth.com] A fainting spell that might look like a stroke can be caused by abnormal heart rhythm, which can be life threatening.[petmd.com] Your vet can distinguish a stroke from a fainting spell by examining your dog’s heart functions to rule out a cardiac problem.[petmd.com]

  • Diabetic Neuropathy

    , and difficulty raising the arms above the shoulders.[physio-pedia.com] Fainting spells upon standing may indicate postural hypotension. A physician may detect early signs of neuropathy.[joslin.org] […] or dizzy spells caused by blood pressure changes (autonomic neuropathy) Urinary or bowel difficulties (autonomic neuropathy) Impotence or vaginal dryness (autonomic neuropathy[diabetes.about.com]

  • Emery-Dreifuss Muscular Dystrophy Type 1

    Initial symptoms are slowly progressive and may include difficulty whistling, closing the eyes, and raising the arms (due to weakness of the scapular stabilizer muscles).[merckmanuals.com]

  • Rheumatic Heart Disease

    Later symptoms may include difficulty lifting objects onto a shelf, lifting your arm to comb or brush your hair, getting out of the bath, and even raising your head or turning[resources.lupus.org]

  • Jellyfish Sting

    (from a lot of contact) SEA WASP OR BOX JELLYFISH Severe burning pain and sting site blistering Raised red spot where stung Skin tissue death Breathing difficulty Sweating[medlineplus.gov] […] or legs Raised red spot where stung Runny nose and watery eyes Swallowing difficulty Sweating SEA NETTLE Mild skin rash (with mild stings) Muscle cramps and breathing difficulty[medlineplus.gov] Nausea and vomiting Abdominal pain Changes in pulse Chest pain Collapse Headache Muscle pain and muscle spasms Pain in the arms or legs For the great majority of bites, stings[medlineplus.gov]

  • Neuropathy

    , and difficulty raising the arms above the shoulders.[emedicine.medscape.com] Fainting spells upon standing may indicate postural hypotension. A physician may detect early signs of neuropathy.[joslin.org] Symptoms of proximal limb weakness include difficulty climbing up and down stairs, difficulty getting up from a seated or supine position, falls due to the knees giving way[emedicine.medscape.com]

  • Diabetic Polyneuropathy

    Fainting spells upon standing may indicate postural hypotension. A physician may detect early signs of neuropathy.[joslin.org] , and difficulty raising the arms above the shoulders.[physio-pedia.com] Symptoms of proximal limb weakness include difficulty climbing up and down stairs, difficulty getting up from a seated or supine position, falls due to the knees giving way[physio-pedia.com]

  • Limb-Girdle Muscular Dystrophy Type 1E

    He had difficulty in climbing stairs, running, getting up from squatting position, and raising arms above the head. There was thinning of shoulders, arms and thighs.[jcdr.net] spell 0001279 5%-29% of people have these symptoms Achilles tendon contracture Shortening of the achilles tendon Tight achilles tendon Last updated: 12/19/2017 Limb-girdle[rarediseases.info.nih.gov] Weak shoulder muscles can make it difficult to raise arms above the head, hold the arms outstretched, or carry heavy objects.[mda.org.au]

Further symptoms