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9,411 Possible Causes for disease progression

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  • Pharyngitis

    Although tendencies were reported for this syndrome, genetic variations influencing risk and disease progression are poorly understood.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]

  • Urinary Tract Infection

    By contrast, anti-glomerular basement membrane (GBM) glomerulonephritis, an autoimmune disease, is one cause of rapidly progressive glomerulonephritis.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov] CONCLUSIONS Our patient's course strongly suggests that rapidly progressive glomerulonephritis should be considered as an early differential diagnosis in cases of progressive[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov] BACKGROUND Type 1 diabetes mellitus (DM) tends to complicate other autoimmune diseases.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]

  • Pneumonia

    progression.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov] This case suggests that plasma exchange might be an effective therapeutic option for patients with progressive interstitial lung disease in steroid- and immunosuppressive[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov] The second type of K. pneumoniae causes a very severe form of the disease and is known as "hypervirulent." "The disease progresses very fast," Chen says.[npr.org]

  • Influenza

    Influenza is a severe disease that is highly infectious and can progress to life-threating diseases such as pneumonia or encephalitis when aggravated.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov] However, treatment after 48 hours of symptoms in adults and children with moderate to severe disease or with progressive disease has been shown to provide some benefit and[pediatrics.aappublications.org] […] of chronic underling diseases) should be treated with antiviral drug as soon as possible.[who.int]

  • Sinusitis

    The disease progresses over a few days or at most a few weeks and often results in vascular invasion and systemic dissemination 2,5 .[radiopaedia.org] Invasive fungal sinusitis is a morbid pathology that typically affects immunocompromised patients and may quickly progress to fulminant disease.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov] […] abscess, and intraparenchymal abscess What causes this disease and how frequent is it?[clinicaladvisor.com]

  • Upper Respiratory Infection

    Lower respiratory tract disease should be considered when symptoms such as fever, cough, sputum, and malaise worsen progressively or after initial transient improvement.[emedicine.medscape.com] […] supraglottic structures that can rapidly progress to airway compromise and, potentially, death. 55 , 56 The incidence of epiglottitis in children has decreased with the use[aafp.org] Lower respiratory tract disease and sepsis represent serious complications, especially in patients with immunocompromise.[emedicine.medscape.com]

  • Acute Gastroenteritis

    […] to severe disease.[emedicine.medscape.com] […] gastroenteritis infection persists at least up to age 6 years. [ 17 ] Prognosis Most cases of AGE follow a relatively benign course, with less than 2% of diarrheal episodes progressing[emedicine.medscape.com]

  • Skin Infection

    progresses.[atsu.edu] These results serve as a springboard for future studies directed to better understand how/why mild or moderate SSTIs progress to invasive disease.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov] These kinds of infections can progress rapidly and become disseminated, leading to very serious or even fatal complications.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]

  • Dementia

    The symptoms and progression of the disease depend on the type of dementia a person has.[healthline.com] An assisted living facility or nursing home may be necessary as the disease progresses.[healthline.com] Despite the high prevalence of BPSD in progressive neurological diseases (PNDs) such as multiple sclerosis, Huntington's disease, and Parkinson's disease, the utility of a[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]

  • Streptococcal Infection

    Close contacts of patients with such severe and rapidly progressive disease often strongly appeal to the treating clinicians for antimicrobial treatment to prevent additional[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov] progresses.[atsu.edu] Today, the pathogen is of major concern because of the occasional cases of rapidly progressive disease and because of the small risk of serious sequelae in untreated infections[textbookofbacteriology.net]

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