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643 Possible Causes for Dysphasia and Aphasia, Sagittal Sinus Thrombosis, Suppression Temporal

  • Brain Neoplasm

    , lethargic, slow 7 Left hemiparesis; 11 L/[mm.sup.3] NI, VEP Babinski 8 Dysphasia, dyslexia 9 Nonfluent aphasia, 10 L/[mm.sup.3] Right pronator drift; Right hemianesthesia[thefreelibrary.com] - - 2 Right crural monoparesis 3 Expressive aphasia 4 Left HH Protein, IgG increased 5 Expressive Normal NI, SSEP, aphasia, Right VEP, BAEP hemiparesis 6 Visual loss (OD)[thefreelibrary.com] (16) 27/F Confusion, Left hemiparesis/ hemianopia, vertigo 9 Giang et al (16) 24/M Right hemisensory loss; feeling "spacey" Evoked Case Examination CSF Potentials 1 Mild dysphasia[thefreelibrary.com]

  • Brain Abscess

    Seven cases presented with difficulty in speech in the form of sensory dysphasia or pure nominal aphasia.[npplweb.com] There was hemiparesis in 52 cases, hemiplegia in 23 cases, monoplegia in 12 cases, monoparesis in 19 cases, motor aphasia in 14 cases, dysphasia in 13 cases, and sensory aphasia[nnjournal.net]

  • Traumatic Brain Injury

    These may include motor dysfunction (paralysis, balance or gait abnormalities), cognitive impairment (amnesia, disorientation, confusion), speech defects (aphasia, dysphasia[symptoma.com]

  • Stroke

    This is called aphasia and is sometimes also known as dysphasia.[hse.ie] Superior sagittal sinus and cerebral cortical venous thrombosis caused by congenital protein C deficiency: case report. Neurol Med Chir. 2000 ; 40 : 645–649.[doi.org] This is called aphasia, or dysphasia, when it's caused by injury to the parts of the brain responsible for language.[nhsinform.scot]

  • Cerebral Thrombosis

    , cerebral sinovenous thrombosis , dural sinus thrombosis , sagittal sinus thrombosis , and sinus thrombosis .[medlink.com] Keywords Sinus Thrombosis Superior Sagittal Sinus Magnetic Resonance Venography Cerebral Venous Sinus Thrombosis Predispose Risk Factor Introduction Cerebral venous sinus[casesjournal.biomedcentral.com] […] and superior sagittal sinus thrombosis.[jmedicalcasereports.com]

    Missing: Suppression Temporal
  • Encephalopathy

    Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome is an encephalopathy that can be clinically characterized by headache, altered mental status and/or seizures. Neuroimaging demonstrates usually reversible bilateral subcortical vasogenic occipital-parietal edema. Exact pathophysiology remains unclear but is commonly[…][ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]

    Missing: Sagittal Sinus Thrombosis
  • Sagittal Sinus Thrombosis

    Subsequent computed tomography and magnetic resonance venography confirmed a superior sagittal sinus thrombosis.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov] Despite surgical elevation of the fracture and repair of the superior sagittal sinus, the patient developed thrombosis of the anterior half of the superior sagittal sinus[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov] The development of superior sagittal sinus thrombosis is multifactorial.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]

    Missing: Suppression Temporal
  • Reversible Ischemic Neurologic Deficit

    General signs and symptoms of stroke include the following: Facial droop Slurred speech Difficulty in speaking (dysphasia) or inability to speak (aphasia) Numbness to the[emsworld.com] In cases of superior sagittal sinus thrombosis, the infarcts are typically bilateral and in a parasagittal location.[spinwarp.ucsd.edu] No proved therapy exists for reversing the temporally completed infarction, whether anatomically complete or not.[dartmouth.edu]

  • Carotid Artery Occlusion

    Typical symptoms are contralateral weakness or sensory disturbance, ipsilateral loss of vision, and (if the dominant hemisphere is involved) dysphasia, aphasia or speech apraxia[patient.info] The stroke may be due to venous thrombosis of the sagittal sinus. 27-16. What are the general preventative measures for stroke? 27-16.[dartmouth.edu] No proved therapy exists for reversing the temporally completed infarction, whether anatomically complete or not.[dartmouth.edu]

  • Alzheimer Disease

    […] cortex; (b) the inability to suppress the default mode network; and (c) improved performance across a range of tasks, including working memory, episodic memory, inhibitory[doi.org] They play compensatory functions because they are associated with the following: (a) under activations in posterior regions such as medial temporal lobe, precuneus, and visual[doi.org]

    Missing: Sagittal Sinus Thrombosis

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