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985 Possible Causes for Episodic Pain and Paresthesia in the Extremities, Patient Appears Acutely Ill

  • Panic Attacks

    […] attacks of sudden, extreme apprehension, fear, autonomic nervous system hyperactivity Clinical Dyspnea, palpitations, chest pain, choking sensation, tachycardia, vertigo,[medical-dictionary.thefreedictionary.com] […] loss of reality sense, paresthesias, hot/cold flashes, sweating, faintness, trembling, a fear of dying or of 'going crazy'; fear of an attack in public may cause functional[medical-dictionary.thefreedictionary.com] […] panic disorder Atypical depression, polysystemic dysautonomia Psychiatry An idiopathic psychogenic complex affecting 1.5% of US, characterized by recurrent and unpredictable episodes–panic[medical-dictionary.thefreedictionary.com]

  • Acute Bronchitis

    Pneumonia Patients with pneumonia often have a higher fever than patients with acute bronchitis, may appear more ill, and have rales on lung examination.[online.epocrates.com] CXR will detect an infiltrate from pneumonia that will not be present in acute bronchitis.[online.epocrates.com] Allergic rhinitis Patients with allergic rhinitis often have postnasal drip causing a cough.[online.epocrates.com]

    Missing: Episodic Pain and Paresthesia in the Extremities
  • Acute Intermittent Porphyria

    Days later brought a new episode of acute delirium, with progressive loss of strength in upper and lower extremities, paresthesias and abdominal pain.[archivesofmedicine.com]

  • Upper Respiratory Infection

    This article has no abstract; the first 100 words appear below. Acute pharyngitis is one of the most common illnesses for which patients visit primary care physicians.[doi.org]

    Missing: Episodic Pain and Paresthesia in the Extremities
  • Acute Gastroenteritis

    Enterovirus D68 (EV-D68) is known to be causative agent of mild to severe upper and lower respiratory illnesses in sporadic cases and outbreaks. We present a case report of a 3-month-old child with acute gastroenteritis who visited a pediatric clinic in Kyushu area in Japan in 2015. A stool sample collected from[…][ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]

    Missing: Episodic Pain and Paresthesia in the Extremities
  • Acute Cystitis

    […] with suprapubic tenderness. 10 Acute pyelonephritis should be suspected if the patient is ill-appearing and seems uncomfortable, particularly if she has concomitant fever[aafp.org] appears ill enough to warrant hospitalization.[antimicrobe.org] Physical Examination and Diagnostic Testing The physical examination of patients with acute uncomplicated cystitis is typically normal, except in the 10 to 20 percent of women[aafp.org]

    Missing: Episodic Pain and Paresthesia in the Extremities
  • Viral Lower Respiratory Infection

    Abstract A systematic literature review was performed to quantify the accuracy of chest radiography in differentiating bacterial from viral lower respiratory infection in children. Relevant studies were identified in a systematic literature search and were included in the review according to predetermined criteria.[…][ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]

    Missing: Episodic Pain and Paresthesia in the Extremities
  • Urinary Tract Infection

    Raoultella ornithinolytica is a Gram-negative, non-motile, encapsulated, aerobic bacillus belonging to the Enterobacteriaceae family. R. ornithinolytica is a not very common, but emergent causal agent of human infection, and its expression of beta-lactamase provides resistance to commonly used antibiotics. The[…][ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]

    Missing: Episodic Pain and Paresthesia in the Extremities
  • Acute Alcohol Intoxication

    T-wave oversensing can be a serious problem that often results in inappropriate device therapy. We report here a patient with binge alcohol use who received multiple, inappropriate ICD shocks due to T-wave oversensing from repolarization changes induced by acute alcohol intoxication and no other relevant metabolic[…][ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]

    Missing: Episodic Pain and Paresthesia in the Extremities
  • Adenovirus Infection

    This is an unusual case of fatal hepatic necrosis caused by disseminated type 5 adenovirus in a renal transplant recipient. This adult patient may have been colonized at the time of transplantation with a kidney from a pediatric donor. The adenovirus became invasive when the host's cellular immune system was[…][ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]

    Missing: Episodic Pain and Paresthesia in the Extremities

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