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60 Possible Causes for Eventual Loss of Peripheral Vision and Night Blindness

  • Retinitis Pigmentosa

    PURPOSE: Retinitis pigmentosa (RP; MIM 268000) is a hereditary disease characterized by poor night vision and progressive loss of photoreceptors, eventually leading to blindness[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov] RP is characterised by the progressive loss of photoreceptor cells and peripheral vision and is associated with night-vision difficulties.[bionicvision.org.au] This results first in the loss of night and peripheral vision, eventually progressing to the loss of central vision and total blindness.[news.ucsb.edu]

  • Cone Rod Dystrophy
  • Retinitis Pigmentosa 26

    RP causes cells in the retina to die, causing progressive vision loss. The first sign of RP usually is night blindness.[jewishgeneticdiseases.org] Patients typically have night vision blindness and loss of midperipheral visual field.[uniprot.org] As the condition progresses, affected individuals develop tunnel vision (loss of peripheral vision), and eventually loss of central vision For detailed information about this[jewishgeneticdiseases.org]

  • Retinitis Pigmentosa 23

    Patients typically have night vision blindness and loss of midperipheral visual field.[uniprot.org] As their condition progresses, they lose their far peripheral visual field and eventually central vision as well.[uniprot.org] Retinitis pigmentosa is characterized by retinal pigment deposits visible on fundus examination and primary loss of rod photoreceptor cells followed by secondary loss of cone[uniprot.org]

  • Meckel Syndrome Type 7

    Loss of peripheral vision (ability to see things on the side when looking straight ahead) follows night blindness and eventually leads to complete blindness in late adulthood[natera.com] The first sign of Choroideremia is typically loss of night vision. This can sometimes occur during childhood but usually begins in the teens.[natera.com]

  • Retinitis Pigmentosa 41

    Patients typically have night vision blindness and loss of midperipheral visual field.[uniprot.org] As their condition progresses, they lose their far peripheral visual field and eventually central vision as well.[uniprot.org] Retinitis pigmentosa is characterized by retinal pigment deposits visible on fundus examination and primary loss of rod photoreceptor cells followed by secondary loss of cone[uniprot.org]

  • Citrullinemia Type 2

    Loss of peripheral vision (ability to see things on the side when looking straight ahead) follows night blindness and eventually leads to complete blindness in late adulthood[natera.com] The first sign of Choroideremia is typically loss of night vision. This can sometimes occur during childhood but usually begins in the teens.[natera.com]

  • Retinitis pigmentosa 44

    Patients typically have night vision blindness and loss of midperipheral visual field.[uniprot.org] As their condition progresses, they lose their far peripheral visual field and eventually central vision as well.[uniprot.org] Retinitis pigmentosa is characterized by retinal pigment deposits visible on fundus examination and primary loss of rod photoreceptor cells followed by secondary loss of cone[uniprot.org]

  • Retinitis Pigmentosa 9

    Patients typically have night vision blindness and loss of midperipheral visual field.[ghr.nlm.nih.gov] As their condition progresses, they lose their far peripheral visual field and eventually central vision as well. {ECO:0000269 PubMed:12032732}.[genecards.org] As their condition progresses, they lose their far peripheral visual field and eventually central vision as well.[ghr.nlm.nih.gov]

  • Retinopathy

    Patients typically have night vision blindness and loss of midperipheral visual field.[uniprot.org] As their condition progresses, they lose their far peripheral visual field and eventually central vision as well.[uniprot.org] Retinitis pigmentosa is characterized by retinal pigment deposits visible on fundus examination and primary loss of rod photoreceptor cells followed by secondary loss of cone[uniprot.org]

Further symptoms