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135 Possible Causes for Exaggerated Lordosis

  • Osteoporosis

    […] cervical lordosis (dowager hump).[emedicine.medscape.com] […] cervical lordosis (dowager hump) Subsequent loss of lumbar lordosis A decrease in height of 2-3 cm after each vertebral compression fracture and progressive kyphosis Patients[emedicine.medscape.com] […] beneficial in screening patients with increased risk of fracture. [92] Signs of fracture Patients with vertebral compression fractures may demonstrate a thoracic kyphosis with an exaggerated[emedicine.medscape.com]

  • Smith-McCort Dysplasia

    Smith-McCort dysplasia (SMC OMIM 615222) and Dyggve-Melchior-Clausen dysplasia (DMC OMIM 223800) are allelic skeletal dysplasias caused by homozygous or compound heterozygous mutations in DYM (OMIM 607461). Both disorders share the same skeletal phenotypes characterized by spondylo-epi-metaphyseal dysplasia with[…][ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]

  • Disorder of the Skeletal System

    Exaggerated lordosis can occur in adolescence, possibly as a result of faulty posture or due to disease affecting the vertebrae and spinal muscles. 3.[ivyroses.com] Kyphosis is the result of an exaggerated thoracic curve. Lordosis: A more common name for lordosis is swayback. Lordosis is the result of an exaggerated lumbar curve.[solaskeletal.weebly.com] Lordosis Inward curvature of the spine. Some lordosis in the lumbar and cervical regions of the spine is normal.[ivyroses.com]

  • Iniencephaly

    Retroflexion of the head with exaggerated cervicothoracic lordosis is always present, and CNS malformations in the form of anencephaly, spina bifida and encephalocele are[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov] Other features include: exaggerated cervicothoracic lordosis deficient (short) or fused cervical vertebrae variable deficit in occipital bone due the the head position, the[radiopaedia.org] Other features include:- exaggerated cervico-thoracic lordosis deficient (short) or fused cervicothoracic vertebrae variable deficit in occipital bone the fetal crown rump[dailyrounds.org]

  • Progressive Pseudorheumatoid Arthropathy of Childhood

    Many patients have spinal involvement manifesting as exaggerated lumbar lordosis, thoracic kyphosis, and/or scoliosis.[orpha.net]

  • Musculoskeletal Lower Back Pain

    In order to do so, there will be an exaggerated lordosis of the lower back, forward flexion of the neck, and downward movement of the shoulders. 5 The abdominal muscles help[practicalpainmanagement.com]

  • Spondyloepimetaphyseal Dysplasia Type Matrilin-3

    Note the short extremities, relatively normal hands, flat facies, and exaggerated lordosis.[clinicalgate.com] Kyphosis and exaggeration of the normal lumbar lordosis are common. The proximal segments of the limbs are shorter than the hands and feet, which often appear normal.[clinicalgate.com]

  • Superior Mesenteric Artery Syndrome

    […] lumbar lordosis Clinical findings Epigastric pain Nausea Repetitive vomiting Abdominal cramping Typically findings are worst in supine position and may be relived by changing[learningradiology.com] […] lumbar lordosis, visceroptosis , abdominal wall laxity, rapid linear growth without compensatory weight gain (particularly in teenagers), rapid severe weight loss , starvation[wikidoc.org] […] lumbar lordosis ( 4 ).[apm.amegroups.com]

  • Spondyloepimetaphyseal Dysplasia Type Aggrecan

    Note the short extremities, relatively normal hands, flat facies, and exaggerated lordosis.[clinicalgate.com] Kyphosis and exaggeration of the normal lumbar lordosis are common. The proximal segments of the limbs are shorter than the hands and feet, which often appear normal.[clinicalgate.com]

  • Spondyloperipheral Dysplasia

    […] back (lordosis), and an inward- and upward-turning foot (clubfoot).[malacards.org] […] back ( lordosis ), and an inward- and upward-turning foot ( clubfoot ).[ghr.nlm.nih.gov] Other skeletal abnormalities associated with spondyloperipheral dysplasia include short stature, shortened long bones of the arms and legs, exaggerated curvature of the lower[malacards.org]

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