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1,167 Possible Causes for Febrile Convulsions, Physiological Neonatal Jaundice, Yellow Discoloration of the Skin

  • Neonatal Sepsis

    We should consider UTI as a probable cause of jaundice and neonates certainly should be evaluated for UTI, if there was a history of worsening jaundice while physiologic jaundice[ijp.mums.ac.ir]

  • Neonatal Jaundice

    Jaundice, Physiological NeonatalNeonatal Jaundice, Physiological — Severe Jaundice in Newborn — Severe Jaundice in Neonate — Icterus Gravis Neonatorum[mesh.kib.ki.se] Definition Neonatal jaundice is the yellowing discoloration of the skin and sclera of a neonate, which is caused by increased levels of bilirubin in the blood.[bestpractice.bmj.com] Neonatal hyperbilirubinemia Neonatal jaundice Newborn physiological jaundice Physiologic jaundice, neonatal Clinical Information Jaundice that appears during the neonatal[icd10data.com]

    Missing: Febrile Convulsions
  • Physiological Neonatal Jaundice

    Published on Jul 10, 2016 Physiological Neonatal Jaundice and Its causes. Physiological Neonatal Jaundice 1. PHYSIOLOGICAL NEONATAL JAUNDICE 10/07/2016 1 2.[slideshare.net] Definition (MSH) Yellow discoloration of the SKIN; MUCOUS MEMBRANE; and SCLERA in the NEWBORN. It is a sign of NEONATAL HYPERBILIRUBINEMIA.[fpnotebook.com] In all ten infants, he observed the yellow discoloration of their skin.[embryo.asu.edu]

    Missing: Febrile Convulsions
  • Scarlet Fever

    Using paracetamol in children or babies does not reduce the risk of febrile convulsions.[patient.info] Additional symptoms include vomiting and a yellow discoloration of the skin and whites of the eyes (jaundice). Severe liver failure is rare.[merckmanuals.com]

    Missing: Physiological Neonatal Jaundice
  • Jaundice

    This is called “physiologic” or normal neonatal jaundice. Most infants have this pattern so no testing is needed.[patients.gi.org] Jaundice is a yellow discoloration of the skin and mucous membranes caused by an excess accumulation of bilirubin in the blood.[medcomic.com] Pathology. yellow discoloration of the skin, whites of the eyes, etc., due to an increase of bile pigments in the blood, often symptomatic of certain diseases, as hepatitis[web.archive.org]

    Missing: Febrile Convulsions
  • Crigler-Najjar Syndrome Type 1

    Physiological neonatal jaundice may peak at 85–170 µmol/l and decline to normal adult concentrations within two weeks. Prematurity results in higher levels.[en.wikipedia.org] This leads to jaundice, i.e. yellow discoloration of skin and eyes. Excess bilirubin can also damage the brain, muscles, and nerves.[medindia.net] Without this enzyme, bilirubin can build up in the body and lead to: Jaundice (yellow discoloration of skin and eyes) Damage to the brain, muscles, and nerves Type I Crigler-Najjar[nlm.nih.gov]

    Missing: Febrile Convulsions
  • Upper Respiratory Infection

    The combination of nasal congestion, rhinorrhea, sore throat, cough, and malaise is the symptomatic profile that constitutes an uncomplicated upper respiratory tract infection (URI), also known as the common cold. Because no known cure exists for a URI, numerous products are available, each marketed with the[…][ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]

    Missing: Physiological Neonatal Jaundice Yellow Discoloration of the Skin
  • Hypercarotinemia

    One of the most common types of jaundice is known as neonatal jaundice (also called physiological jaundice).[medfriendly.com] […] hi"per-kar" cah te ne' me-ah an excessive amount of carotene in the blood usually associated with a yellow discoloration of the skin. hy·per·car·o·te·ne·mi·a ( hīpĕr-kārŏ-tĕ-nēmē-ă[medical-dictionary.thefreedictionary.com] Carotenoderma is the presence of large amounts of carotene in the skin. Xanthoderma is a yellow discoloration of the skin of any cause.[healthhype.com]

    Missing: Febrile Convulsions
  • Influenza

    In specific cases, influenza vaccines were associated with serious harms such as narcolepsy and febrile convulsions.[doi.org] Additionally, influenza can cause a range of non‐respiratory complications, including febrile convulsions, Reye's syndrome, and myocarditis ( Treanor 2016 ; Wiselka 1994 )[doi.org] Additionally, influenza can cause a range of non‐respiratory complications including febrile convulsions, Reye's syndrome, and myocarditis ( Treanor 2016 ; Wiselka 1994 ).[doi.org]

    Missing: Physiological Neonatal Jaundice Yellow Discoloration of the Skin
  • Acute Otitis Media

    Signs Examination may reveal: High temperature (febrile convulsions may be associated with the temperature rise in AOM). A red, yellow or cloudy tympanic membrane.[patient.info] In a small child with a high temperature there is a risk of febrile convulsions. This is discussed more fully in its own article. Rare complications include Petrositis.[patient.info]

    Missing: Physiological Neonatal Jaundice Yellow Discoloration of the Skin