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44 Possible Causes for Fever, Hyperbilirubinemia, Onset in First Weeks or Months of Life

  • Neonatal Sepsis

    Early-onset sepsis is seen in the first week of life. Occurs after 1 week and before 3 months of age.[omicsonline.org] Fever or frequent changes in temperature Breathing rapidly, difficulty breathing, or periods of no breathing (apnea) Poor feeding from breast or bottle Decreased or absent[lahey.org] The incidence rate of hyperbilirubinemia due to infection is unknown (7,8).[ijp.mums.ac.ir]

  • Cholestasis

    Clinical description The first cholestatic episode can occur at any age but onset within the first two decades of life is most common.[orpha.net] The patient was a 2-month-old male infant who presented with cholestasis, combined with fever and panhypopituitarism.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov] We believe our patient’s persistent direct hyperbilirubinemia with biopsy-confirmed cholestasis was also likely related to his AHC.[pediatrics.aappublications.org]

  • Sepsis

    Early-onset sepsis is seen in the first week of life. Late onset sepsis occurs after 1 week through 3 months of age.[medlineplus.gov] After discussing the physiological aspects of fever production, the present review aims to delineate the advantages and drawbacks of fever in septic patients.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov] Hyperbilirubinemia did not return in 3 months.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]

  • Streptococcal Septicemia

    […] are infected within the first week of life, it is called early-onset GBS disease.[sepsis.org] […] hue and is less punctate than scarlet fever.[henriettes-herb.com] […] homocystinaemia (Br Eng) hydremia (Am Eng) or hydraemia (Br Eng) hydroxyprolinemia (Am Eng) or hydroxyporlinaemia (Br Eng) hyperamylasemia (Am Eng) or hyperamylasaemia (Br Eng) hyperbilirubinemia[wordlister.blogspot.com]

  • Sepsis in Premature Infants

    Early-onset sepsis is seen in the first week of life. Late onset sepsis occurs after 1 week through 3 months of age.[medlineplus.gov] About 78.2% of infants with sepsis in our study had maternal risk factors such as a history of fever and of meconeal amniotic fluid.[degruyter.com] Other signs and symptoms include lethargy, temperature instability, hyperbilirubinemia, bradycardia, seizures and acidosis.[uichildrens.org]

  • Neonatal Infection

    Early-onset sepsis is seen in the first week of life. Late onset sepsis occurs after 1 week through 3 months of age.[nlm.nih.gov] Risk factors for perinatally acquired bacterial infection in the neonate include maternal fever during labour, preterm or prolonged rupture of membranes, preterm onset of[doi.org] […] low-risk for having a serious bacterial illness: [2] generally well-appearing previously healthy full term (at 37 weeks gestation) no antibiotics perinatally no unexplained hyperbilirubinemia[en.wikipedia.org]

  • Laryngeal Stridor

    Congenital abnormalities of the upper airway typically present in the first few weeks to months of life and are the most common causes of stridor (87%).[medicine.uiowa.edu] Clinically, the cause of the fever could not be localized.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov] […] headache, memory impairment, cerebrospinal bleeding, hyponatremia, syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion, nausea and vomiting, uterine rupture, neonatal hyperbilirubinemia[ccforum.biomedcentral.com]

  • Beta-Hemolytic Streptococcus

    In newborns, if the GBS infection develops in the first week of life, it is termed early onset disease.[medicinenet.com] Symptoms included fever, irritability, lethargy, and altered-feeding pattern which lasted less than 24 hours in 88% of patients.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov] His early course was complicated by transient tachypnea requiring oxygen therapy for 2 1/2 days and hyperbilirubinemia requiring phototherapy for four days.[cirp.org]

  • Intrahepatic Cholestasis

    Clinical description The first cholestatic episode can occur at any age but onset within the first two decades of life is most common.[orpha.net] The patient's fever and liver dysfunction improved upon administration of minocycline.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov] Dubin-Johnson syndrome may manifest as conjugated hyperbilirubinemia, darkly pigmented liver, presence of abnormal pigment in the parenchyma of hepatocytes and abnormal distribution[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]

  • Encephalopathy

    Clinical description Onset of EIEE occurs within the first 3 months of life but some present within the first few weeks after birth.[orpha.net] All of them developed disturbance of consciousness around the 7th day post onset of fever.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov] Patients with cirrhosis who also have older age, hypoalbuminemia, hyperbilirubinemia, severe ascites, Child Pugh Class C, diabetes, malnutrition, and H.[clinicaladvisor.com]

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