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262 Possible Causes for Fidgeting, Involuntary Tongue Protrusion

  • Sunburn

    We also know that those who are more physically active, even if that activity is mere fidgeting, produce more heat through muscular contraction and thereby prefer cooler temperatures[scientificamerican.com]

    Missing: Involuntary Tongue Protrusion
  • Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder

    Hyperactivity means a person seems to move about constantly, including in situations in which it is not appropriate; or excessively fidgets, taps, or talks.[nimh.nih.gov] Is Helpful for ADHD Patients, Study Shows Feb. 22, 2016 — Children often fidget or move when they are trying to solve a problem, and that movement may have a positive effect[sciencedaily.com] Not good at following instructions Unable or not good at completing step by step projects Unable to stay focused Unable to stay still, continuously fidget and move Constantly[symptoma.com]

    Missing: Involuntary Tongue Protrusion
  • Orofacial Dyskinesia

    Keywords Lower Face Botulinum Toxin Injection Tongue Protrusion Dystonic Movement Tardive Dystonia These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors.[link.springer.com] […] pouting of the lips, and tongue protrusions.[en.wikipedia.org] : o Grimacing o Tongue protrusion o Lip smacking o Puckering or Pursing of the lips o Rapid eye blinking o Rapid movements of the arms o Rapid leg movement o Finger movements[slideshare.net]

    Missing: Fidgeting
  • Rheumatic Chorea

    Abstract Two unrelated patients with a family history of rheumatic fever had isolated, acquired chorea. Both index cases, as well as affected family members, had increased expression of the rheumatic B-cell alloantigen D8/17. This test may help differentiate Sydenham chorea from lupus chorea.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]

    Missing: Involuntary Tongue Protrusion
  • Senile Chorea

    Chorea symptoms can range from minor movements, such as fidgeting, to severe uncontrolled movements of the arms and legs.[healthline.com] It usually affects orofacial and lingual musculature (“buccolinguomasticatory syndrome”) with chewing; bruxism; protrusion, curling, or twisting of the tongue; lip smacking[mdedge.com] The severity of chorea can range from mere twitching and fidgeting to persistent, violent movements of the limbs.[medic8.com]

  • Huntington Disease-Like 3

    These include behavioral disturbances, irritability, hallucinations, moodiness, restlessness or fidgeting, psychosis and or paranoia.[en.wikibooks.org] However, clinical characteristics such as dystonia with prominent orofacial involvement with tongue protrusion, involuntary tongue- and lip-biting, head thrusts, and rubber[movementdisorders.org] Initially, mild chorea may cause the patient to appear restless, as if they are fidgeting.[physio-pedia.com]

  • Huntington Disease-Like 1

    Initially, mild chorea may cause the patient to appear restless, as if they are fidgeting.[physio-pedia.com] However, clinical characteristics such as dystonia with prominent orofacial involvement with tongue protrusion, involuntary tongue- and lip-biting, head thrusts, and rubber[movementdisorders.org]

  • Chorea Acanthocytosis Syndrome

    Chorea symptoms can range from minor movements, such as fidgeting, to severe uncontrolled movements of the arms and legs.[healthline.com] These symptoms may be referred to as orofacial and lingual dyskinesia and include protrusion of the tongue, grimacing, and abnormal jaw movements.[rarediseases.org] Tongue protrusion and feeding dystonia: a hallmark of chorea-acanthocytosis. Mov Disord 2010;25:127–129. 62.[e-jmd.org]

  • Haldol

    Akathisia : Antipsychotics are associated with causing akathisia or feelings of internal restlessness that result in repetitive movements such as rocking or fidgeting.[mentalhealthdaily.com] The syndrome is characterized by rhythmical involuntary movements of tongue, face, mouth or jaw (e. g., protrusion of tongue, puffing of cheeks, puckering of mouth, chewing[healthyplace.com] Sometimes these may be accompanied by involuntary movements of extremities and the trunk.[healthyplace.com]

  • Attention Deficit Disorder

    Hyperactivity means a person seems to move about constantly, including in situations in which it is not appropriate; or excessively fidgets, taps, or talks.[nimh.nih.gov] […] marked especially by persistent symptoms of inattention (such as distractibility, forgetfulness, or disorganization) or by symptoms of hyperactivity and impulsivity (such as fidgeting[merriam-webster.com]

    Missing: Involuntary Tongue Protrusion

Further symptoms