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52 Possible Causes for Fixed Extension Deformity of Knees

  • Lethal Congenital Contracture Syndrome 6

    Knees (fixed extension or flexion). Rigid bilateral club feet/vertical tali. Other characteristic features include: Thin subcutaneous tissue and absent skin creases.[patient.info] Elbows (extension or fixed flexion). Wrists (deviation). Deformity of thumb and palm and rigid interphalangeal joints. Hips (with dislocation of one or both sides).[patient.info] Symmetrical deformities (becoming more severe distally). Rigid joints. Congenital dislocation of the hips (and sometimes the knees).[patient.info]

  • Popliteal Pterygium Syndrome

    We reviewed four patients between 1964 and 1986, three of whom were severely affected with fixed flexion deformities at the knee.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov] Distal femoral shortening and extension osteotomies provided good results, and this procedure should be considered earlier rather than later in treatment of this problem.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]

  • Kuskokwim Disease

    Symptoms and Signs Some of the more common signs and symptoms are linked with the shoulder (internal rotation deformity), elbow (extension and pronation deformity), wrist[dianamossop.com] Symptoms & Signs Some of the more common signs & symptoms are linked with the shoulder (internal rotation deformity), elbow (extension & pronation deformity), wrist (volar[signssymptoms.org] (volar and ulnar deformity), hand (fingers in fixed flexion and thumb-in-palm deformity), hip (flexed, abducted and externally rotated, often dislocated), knee (flexion deformity[dianamossop.com]

  • Joint Contracture

    Guided Growth for Fixed Knee Flexion Deformity. Available from: [last accessed 28/08/16][physio-pedia.com] Available from: [last accessed 06/08/16] Mauro C, Treatment of fixed knee flexion deformity and crouch gait using distal femur extension osteotomy in cerebral palsy, 2008,[physio-pedia.com] Rotational mobilizations for achieving knee extension. Available from: [last accessed 28/08/16] MikeReinold.com. The Best and Easiest Way to Restore Knee Extension.[physio-pedia.com]

  • Arthrogryposis Multiplex Congenita

    Knees (fixed extension or flexion). Rigid bilateral club feet/vertical tali. Other characteristic features include: Thin subcutaneous tissue and absent skin creases.[patient.info] … In the commonest form of arthrogryposis, called amyoplasia, the typical deformities are … Shoulder - internal rotation deformity … Elbow - extension and pronation deformity[ibis-birthdefects.org] Elbows (extension or fixed flexion). Wrists (deviation). Deformity of thumb and palm and rigid interphalangeal joints. Hips (with dislocation of one or both sides).[patient.info]

  • Arthrogryposis Syndrome

    Knees (fixed extension or flexion). Rigid bilateral club feet/vertical tali. Other characteristic features include: Thin subcutaneous tissue and absent skin creases.[patient.info] … In the commonest form of arthrogryposis, called amyoplasia, the typical deformities are … Shoulder - internal rotation deformity … Elbow - extension and pronation deformity[ibis-birthdefects.org] Knees The goal of treatment is an extended knee for ambulation. This is more easily accomplished in an extension or hyperextension deformity than in a flexion deformity.[emedicine.medscape.com]

  • Epiphyseal Trauma

    Who had no neurovascular deficit, with fixed extension deformity at the left knee was treated early with closed reduction techniques.[jocr.co.in]

  • Alkaptonuria

    She also had 30-degree fixed flexion bilateral varus knee deformity with decreased flexionextension range of motion.[archivesofrheumatology.org] According to the clinical examination, the patient had bilateral fixed flexion deformity in both hips with decreased flexion-extension motion with no abduction or adduction[archivesofrheumatology.org]

  • X-Linked Congenital Lower Limb Arthrogyrposis

    Knees (fixed extension or flexion). Rigid bilateral club feet/vertical tali. Other characteristic features include: Thin subcutaneous tissue and absent skin creases.[patient.info] Elbows (extension or fixed flexion). Wrists (deviation). Deformity of thumb and palm and rigid interphalangeal joints. Hips (with dislocation of one or both sides).[patient.info] Symmetrical deformities (becoming more severe distally). Rigid joints. Congenital dislocation of the hips (and sometimes the knees).[patient.info]

  • Familial Amniotic Bands

    Knees (fixed extension or flexion). Rigid bilateral club feet/vertical tali. Other characteristic features include: Thin subcutaneous tissue and absent skin creases.[patient.info] Elbows (extension or fixed flexion). Wrists (deviation). Deformity of thumb and palm and rigid interphalangeal joints. Hips (with dislocation of one or both sides).[patient.info] Symmetrical deformities (becoming more severe distally). Rigid joints. Congenital dislocation of the hips (and sometimes the knees).[patient.info]

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