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27 Possible Causes for Focal Sharp-Waves or Spikes Occipital or Temporal, Paroxysmal Activity - Sharp-Waves Parietal

  • Epilepsy

    345 Epilepsy and recurrent seizures 345.0 Generalized nonconvulsive epilepsy 345.00 Generalized nonconvulsive epilepsy, without mention of intractable epilepsy convert 345.00 to ICD-10-CM 345.01 Generalized nonconvulsive epilepsy, with intractable epilepsy convert 345.01 to ICD-10-CM 345.1 Generalized convulsive epilepsy[…][icd9data.com]

  • Vascular Dementia

    Vascular dementia (VaD) is a common dementing illness. There are no pharmacological agents with a regulatory approval for its treatment or prevention. Review of published clinical trial reports indicates that early treatment of hypertension, a risk factor for stroke, reduces VaD risk and slows progression. However,[…][ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]

  • Encephalitis

    To describe a case of leucine-rich, glioma inactivated 1 antibody-encephalitis presenting with psychosis. Case report. A young man with leucine-rich, glioma inactivated 1-antibody encephalitis initially presented with acute psychotic symptoms, short-term memory loss and faciobrachial dystonic seizures. Magnetic resonance[…][ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]

  • Rolandic Epilepsy

    Benign Rolandic epilepsy or benign childhood epilepsy with centrotemporal spikes (BCECTS) is the most common epilepsy syndrome in childhood. Most children will outgrow the syndrome (it starts around the age of 3–13 with a peak around 8–9 years and stops around age 14–18), hence the label benign. The seizures,[…][en.wikipedia.org]

  • Creutzfeldt Jakob Disease

    Please note: An erratum has been published for this report. To view the erratum, please click here. Ryusuke Ae, MD, PhD 1 ; Tsuyoshi Hamaguchi, MD, PhD 2 ; Yosikazu Nakamura, MD 1 ; Masahito Yamada, MD, PhD 2 ; Tadashi Tsukamoto, MD, PhD 3 ; Hidehiro Mizusawa, MD, PhD 3 ; Ermias D. Belay, MD 4 ; Lawrence B.[…][doi.org]

  • Periventricular Leukomalacia

    The purpose of this prospective study is to verify whether fetal periventricular echodensity (PVE) precedes neonatal periventricular leukomalacia (PVL). Fetal brains were studied with transvaginal scan in 63 high-risk fetuses from 17 to 32 weeks of pregnancy, PVE echogenicity was quantified with ultrasonic[…][ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]

  • Fragile X Syndrome

    Fragile X syndrome is a genetic condition caused by a mutation of the fragile X mental retardation 1 (FMR1) gene on the X chromosome. Fragile X syndrome in males is usually more severe than in females and males are never asymptomatic. This is because males have only one X chromosome (unlike females that have 2[…][symptoma.com]

  • Generalized Clonic or Tonic-Clonic Seizures

    Onset usually occurs in the second decade. Generalised tonic clonic seizures (GTCS) can occur at any time with majority in the early morning often precipitated by sleep deprivation and other external factors. The EEG shows generalised spike and wave discharges of 3 to 4 Hz and some with photic sensitivity. This is[…][pennsw.com.au]

    Missing: Paroxysmal Activity - Sharp-Waves Parietal
  • Benign Adult Familial Myoclonic Epilepsy

    OBJECTIVE: The pathogenesis of benign adult familial myoclonic epilepsy (BAFME) remains unknown, although cerebellar pathologic changes and brain hyperexcitability have been reported. We used resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to examine the functional connectivity between the cerebellum and[…][ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]

    Missing: Paroxysmal Activity - Sharp-Waves Parietal
  • Juvenile Myoclonic Epilepsy

    Juvenile myoclonic epilepsy is a condition characterized by recurrent seizures (epilepsy). This condition begins in childhood or adolescence, usually between ages 12 and 18, and lasts into adulthood. The most common type of seizure in people with this condition is myoclonic seizures, which cause rapid, uncontrolled muscle[…][ghr.nlm.nih.gov]

    Missing: Paroxysmal Activity - Sharp-Waves Parietal

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