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16 Possible Causes for Focal Sharp-Waves or Spikes Occipital or Temporal, Paroxysmal Activity - Spikes Central Bilaterally, Paroxysmal Activity - Spikes Parietal Left

  • Benign Adult Familial Myoclonic Epilepsy

    Between these bursts are inserted periods of variable duration without obvious paroxysmal discharges but with θ–wave activity of variable amplitude involving both central[neupsykey.com] […] regions subcontinuously. 23 Bilateral jerk may be time locked with a cortical spike.[neupsykey.com]

  • Epilepsy

    Jerome Engel, Timothy A. Pedley, Jean Aicardi Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 2008 - 3056 Seiten Written and edited by world-renowned authorities, this three-volume work is, to quote a reviewer, "the definitive textbook about seizures and epilepsy". This Second Edition is thoroughly updated and gives you a complete print[…][books.google.com]

  • Generalized Clonic or Tonic-Clonic Seizures

    ‘Contrary to popular folk belief, nothing should be placed in the mouth during the seizure. Severe injury could occur.’ Generalized tonic clonic seizures (grand mal seizures) are the most common and best known type of generalized seizure. They begin with stiffening of the limbs (the tonic phase), followed by jerking[…][epilepsynw.org]

  • Juvenile Myoclonic Epilepsy

    Delayed diagnosis of juvenile myoclonic epilepsy. R A Grünewald, E Chroni, C P Panayiotopoulos Department of Clinical Neurophysiology and Epilepsy, St Thomas' Hospital, London, UK. Abstract Fifteen cases of juvenile myoclonic epilepsy (JME) were identified from one hundred and eighty consecutive patients referred to a[…][doi.org]

  • West Syndrome

    IARS2 encodes isoleucine-tRNA synthetase, which is aclass-1 amino acyl-tRNA synthetase. IARS2 mutations are reported to cause Leigh syndrome or cataracts, growth hormone deficiency, sensory neuropathy, sensorineural hearing loss, and skeletal dysphasia syndrome (CAGSSS). To our knowledge, IARS2 mutations and[…][ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]

  • Idiopathic Generalized Epilepsy

    Epilepsia. 2012 Dec;53(12):2079-90. doi: 10.1111/j.1528-1167.2012.03723.x. Epub 2012 Oct 25. Author information 1 Department of Medicine, St. Vincent's Hospital, The University of Melbourne, Victoria Parade, Fitzroy, Victoria, Australia. udaya.seneviratne@svhm.org.au Abstract Prognosis describes the trajectory and long-term[…][ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]

  • Encephalopathy

    *Repetitive and fairly stereotyped waveforms appearing at regular intervals, sharps/spike waves or complex discharges.[slideshare.net] […] frontal lobe lesion *OIRDA --occipital dominant ,seen in children as in absence seizure *TIRDA– temporal lobe epilepsy 21.[slideshare.net] *Frontal dominance (FIRDA) --non specific ,diffuse encephalopathy, if focal ?[slideshare.net]

  • Organic Brain Syndrome

    Abstract This study addresses the prevalence of organic brain syndrome (OBS) among long-term toluene-exposed rotagravure workers who are still working. The prevalence of OBS in 22 workers exposed to toluene for a minimum of 12 years and 19 unexposed control subjects, matched for age and employment status,[…][ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]

  • Juvenile Absence Epilepsy

    PURPOSE: The aim of this study to evaluate the hippocampal, frontal and thalamic lobe functions in the early stage of the juvenile absence epilepsy (JAE) by magnetic resonance proton spectroscopy (MRS). METHOD: Fourteen patients with juvenile absence epilepsy with typical absence seizures and 10 healthy volunteer[…][ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]

  • Uremic Encephalopathy

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Uremic encephalopathy is a metabolic disorder in patients with renal failure. The purpose of this study was to describe the MR imaging findings of uremic encephalopathy. MATERIALS AND METHODS: This study retrospectively reviewed MR imaging findings in 10 patients with clinically proved uremic[…][ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]