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20 Possible Causes for Heart Disease, Systolic Thrill at Lower Left Sternal Border

  • Patent Ductus Arteriosus

    To our knowledge, this is the first reported use of OCT use in pediatric patients outside the coronaries, and in patients with congenital heart disease.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov] They occur rather rarely in the absence of cyanotic congenital heart disease.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov] disease.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]

  • Aortic Valve Stenosis

    The heart failure derived from AS and ischemic heart disease with severely compromised LV function.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov] Abstract The patient was an 80-year-old man with low cardiac output syndrome associated with triple-vessel ischemic heart disease and severe aortic stenosis (AS).[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov] Why do we need new guidelines on valvular heart disease? 2.2. Content of these guidelines 2.3. New format of the guidelines 2.4 How to use these guidelines 3.[escardio.org]

  • Ventricular Septal Defect

    3 to 4/6 holosystolic murmur (with or without thrill) at the lower left sternal border; this murmur is usually audible within the first few days of life (see table Heart[msdmanuals.com] Not counting those occurring as part of a complex heart disease, VSD accounts for about 15 - 20% of all congenital heart diseases.[singhealth.com.sg] Muscular defects can be heard along the lower left sternal border and may vary in intensity as the defect size changes with muscular contraction throughout systole.[circ.ahajournals.org]

  • Apical Myocardial Infarction

    This murmur is loudest along the lower left sternal border and is associated with a palpable parasternal systolic thrill. RV and LV S3 gallops are common.[emedicine.medscape.com] Myocardial Infarction: A Companion to Braunwald’s Heart Disease, by David A.[books.google.com] Diagnosis Ischemic heart disease is typically associated with an underlying specific heart disease.[courses.lumenlearning.com]

  • Tetralogy of Fallot

    Systolic thrill at the lower left sternal border. Aortic ejection click.[patient.info] The risk of transmission of congenital heart disease is approximately 5-50%, compared to a background risk of 1% of having a baby with congenital heart disease.[heartdiseaseandpregnancy.com] Tetralogy of Fallot accounts for 10% of the cases of congenital heart disease.[pted.org]

  • Large Ventricular Septal Defect

    3 to 4/6 holosystolic murmur (with or without thrill) at the lower left sternal border; this murmur is usually audible within the first few days of life (see table Heart[merckmanuals.com] Ventricular Septal Defect (VSD) VSDs represent the commonest form of congenital heart disease.[bcm.edu] The risk of transmission of congenital heart disease is between 5-10%, compared to a background risk of 1% of having a baby with congenital heart disease.[heartdiseaseandpregnancy.com]

  • Right Ventricular Hypertrophy

    3 to 4/6 holosystolic murmur (with or without thrill) at the lower left sternal border; this murmur is usually audible within the first few days of life (see table Heart[merckmanuals.com] BACKGROUND: The outcome of the surgical repair in congenital heart disease correlates with the degree of myocardial damage.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov] We compared hypertrophy-signaling pathways between the RV and the LV in patients with congenital heart disease (CHD).[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]

  • Tricuspid Valve Insufficiency

    In severe TR, a right jugular venous thrill may be palpable, as may systolic hepatic pulsation and an RV impulse at the left lower sternal border.[merckmanuals.com] […] of the tricuspid valve in the right-sided heart complications often seen in adults with congenital heart disease.[books.google.com] Why do we need new guidelines on valvular heart disease? 2.2. Content of these guidelines 2.3. New format of the guidelines 2.4 How to use these guidelines 3.[escardio.org]

  • Biventricular Hypertrophy

    3 to 4/6 holosystolic murmur (with or without thrill) at the lower left sternal border; this murmur is usually audible within the first few days of life (see table Heart[msdmanuals.com] disease is the most common developmental malformation and the leading cause of neonatal mortality and morbidity.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov] The diphasic QRS type of electrocardiogram in congenital heart disease . Am Heart J; 1937, 13: 202-206. Elliott LP, Anderson RC, Tuna N, Adams P, Neufeld HN.[lifeinthefastlane.com]

  • Mitral Annulus Calcification

    A systolic expansion impulse along the lower left sternal border may be palpable, due to excess filling of the enlarged LA, which pushes the heart anteriorly.[cardiologyforyou.blogspot.com] Abstract M-mode and two-dimensional echocardiograms of 3,254 patients without evidence of rheumatic heart disease were evaluated retrospectively for evidence of aortic cusp[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov] In cross-sectional data, prevalence and interrelationships of MAC, coronary heart disease (CHD), and risk factors were compared using multivariable logistic regression.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]

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