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31 Possible Causes for Hemolysis, Physiological Neonatal Jaundice, Yellow Discoloration of the Skin

  • Neonatal Jaundice

    (ABO/Rh isoimmunization or hereiditary spherocytosis) Within 48 hours Hemolysis Infection Physiologic After 48 hours Infection Hemolysis Breast Milk Congenital malformation[step2.medbullets.com] Jaundice, Physiological NeonatalNeonatal Jaundice, Physiological — Severe Jaundice in Newborn — Severe Jaundice in Neonate — Icterus Gravis Neonatorum[mesh.kib.ki.se] Definition Neonatal jaundice is the yellowing discoloration of the skin and sclera of a neonate, which is caused by increased levels of bilirubin in the blood.[bestpractice.bmj.com]

  • Physiological Neonatal Jaundice

    Kaplan M, Hammerman C, Rubaltelli FF et al (2002) Hemolysis and bilirubin conjugation in association with UDP-glucuronosyltransferase 1A1 promoter polymorphism.[link.springer.com] Published on Jul 10, 2016 Physiological Neonatal Jaundice and Its causes. Physiological Neonatal Jaundice 1. PHYSIOLOGICAL NEONATAL JAUNDICE 10/07/2016 1 2.[slideshare.net] Definition (MSH) Yellow discoloration of the SKIN; MUCOUS MEMBRANE; and SCLERA in the NEWBORN. It is a sign of NEONATAL HYPERBILIRUBINEMIA.[fpnotebook.com]

  • Jaundice

    However, all of these classical features are not always revealed in the case of mild hemolysis or when hemolysis is well compensated.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov] This is called “physiologic” or normal neonatal jaundice. Most infants have this pattern so no testing is needed.[patients.gi.org] Jaundice is a yellow discoloration of the skin and mucous membranes caused by an excess accumulation of bilirubin in the blood.[medcomic.com]

  • Crigler-Najjar Syndrome Type 1

    Careful evaluation of inappropriately elevated bilirubin level compared with the degree of hemolysis is important, reflecting the therapeutic implication of splenectomy and[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov] Physiological neonatal jaundice may peak at 85–170 µmol/l and decline to normal adult concentrations within two weeks. Prematurity results in higher levels.[en.wikipedia.org] This leads to jaundice, i.e. yellow discoloration of skin and eyes. Excess bilirubin can also damage the brain, muscles, and nerves.[medindia.net]

  • Gilbert Syndrome

    […] from mechanical heart valve replacement) chronic hemolysis can be warranted.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov] jaundice, unspecified 2016 2017 2018 2019 Billable/Specific Code Code on Newborn Record Applicable To Neonatal physiological jaundice (intense)(prolonged) NOS due to or associated[icd10data.com] High levels of bilirubin in the blood may produce jaundice (a yellow discoloration of the skin and/or eyes), and in the urine may produce a tea-coloured appearance.[liver.ca]

  • Breast Milk Jaundice

    View in: PubMed subject areas Bilirubin Breast Feeding Glucosephosphate Dehydrogenase Deficiency Hemolysis Humans Infant, Newborn Jaundice, Neonatal Prognosis Terminology[profiles.umassmed.edu] neonatal jaundice is a diagnosis of exclusion![amboss.com] These may include: yellow discoloration of the skin and the whites of the eyes fatigue listlessness poor weight gain high-pitched crying Infants are born with high levels[healthline.com]

  • Rotor Syndrome

    Still, it can be useful to perform hemolysis tests, such as hemoglobin, reticulocyte count, haptoglobin level and blood smear, which will all be normal.[symptoma.com] Neonatal jaundice and Breast-milk jaundice Conjugated hyperbilirubinaemia Hepatocellular – Diminished hepatocyte function.[lifeinthefastlane.com] Introduction Jaundice refers to yellow discoloration of the skin, sclera, mucous membranes, and body fluids.[pedsinreview.aappublications.org]

  • Hereditary Spherocytosis

    However, all of these classical features are not always revealed in the case of mild hemolysis or when hemolysis is well compensated.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov] Applicable To Neonatal physiological jaundice (intense)(prolonged) NOS spherocytosis D58.0 (congenital) Spherocytosis (congenital) (familial) (hereditary) D58.0 hemoglobin[icd10data.com] Jaundice - yellow discoloration of the skin and white part of eyeball. Enlarged spleen (splenomegaly) - palpable on the left side of abdomen beneath the rib cage.[symptoma.com]

  • Crigler-Najjar Syndrome Type 2

    Patients suffering from Crigler-Najjar syndrome present with jaundice, but without hemolysis or other evidence of increased production of bilirubin, and without liver disease[symptoma.com] Physiological neonatal jaundice may peak at 85–170 µmol/l and decline to normal adult concentrations within two weeks. Prematurity results in higher levels.[en.wikipedia.org] This leads to jaundice, i.e. yellow discoloration of skin and eyes. Excess bilirubin can also damage the brain, muscles, and nerves.[medindia.net]

  • Kernicterus

    Nevertheless, bilirubin is still considered toxic to premature infants and infants with hemolysis.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov] Nielsen HE, Haase P, Blaabjerg J, Stryhn H, Hilden J: Risk factors and sib correlation in physiological neonatal jaundice. Acta Paediatr Scand 1987;76:504–511.[karger.com] Overview Infant jaundice is yellow discoloration of a newborn baby's skin and eyes.[mayoclinic.org]

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