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29 Possible Causes for Hemolytic Anemia, Physiological Neonatal Jaundice, Yellow Discoloration of the Skin

  • Neonatal Jaundice

    Jaundice, Physiological NeonatalNeonatal Jaundice, Physiological — Severe Jaundice in Newborn — Severe Jaundice in Neonate — Icterus Gravis Neonatorum[mesh.kib.ki.se] Anemia ) G6PD Deficiency Delivery at 35 to 36 weeks gestation or earlier Gestational age Significant Birth Trauma Cephalohematoma Large hematomas or significant Bruising[fpnotebook.com] Definition Neonatal jaundice is the yellowing discoloration of the skin and sclera of a neonate, which is caused by increased levels of bilirubin in the blood.[bestpractice.bmj.com]

  • Physiological Neonatal Jaundice

    Published on Jul 10, 2016 Physiological Neonatal Jaundice and Its causes. Physiological Neonatal Jaundice 1. PHYSIOLOGICAL NEONATAL JAUNDICE 10/07/2016 1 2.[slideshare.net] Definition (MSH) Yellow discoloration of the SKIN; MUCOUS MEMBRANE; and SCLERA in the NEWBORN. It is a sign of NEONATAL HYPERBILIRUBINEMIA.[fpnotebook.com] […] jaundice. hemolytic jaundice jaundice associated with hemolytic anemia in which most of the bilirubin is unconjugated.[medical-dictionary.thefreedictionary.com]

  • Jaundice

    This is called “physiologic” or normal neonatal jaundice. Most infants have this pattern so no testing is needed.[patients.gi.org] Jaundice is a yellow discoloration of the skin and mucous membranes caused by an excess accumulation of bilirubin in the blood.[medcomic.com] Hemolytic Anemia In a condition called hemolytic anemia, a large number of red blood cells are destroyed.[healdove.com]

  • Gilbert Syndrome

    jaundice, unspecified 2016 2017 2018 2019 Billable/Specific Code Code on Newborn Record Applicable To Neonatal physiological jaundice (intense)(prolonged) NOS due to or associated[icd10data.com] High levels of bilirubin in the blood may produce jaundice (a yellow discoloration of the skin and/or eyes), and in the urine may produce a tea-coloured appearance.[liver.ca] anemia, hemolysis from mechanical heart valve replacement) chronic hemolysis can be warranted.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]

  • Hereditary Spherocytosis

    Applicable To Neonatal physiological jaundice (intense)(prolonged) NOS spherocytosis D58.0 (congenital) Spherocytosis (congenital) (familial) (hereditary) D58.0 hemoglobin[icd10data.com] Jaundice - yellow discoloration of the skin and white part of eyeball. Enlarged spleen (splenomegaly) - palpable on the left side of abdomen beneath the rib cage.[symptoma.com] Hereditary spherocytosis (HS) and pyruvate kinase (PK) deficiency are the most common causes of congenital hemolytic anemia.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]

  • Breast Milk Jaundice

    neonatal jaundice is a diagnosis of exclusion![amboss.com] These may include: yellow discoloration of the skin and the whites of the eyes fatigue listlessness poor weight gain high-pitched crying Infants are born with high levels[healthline.com] anemia is suspected.[medical-dictionary.thefreedictionary.com]

  • Hypercarotinemia

    One of the most common types of jaundice is known as neonatal jaundice (also called physiological jaundice).[medfriendly.com] […] hi"per-kar" cah te ne' me-ah an excessive amount of carotene in the blood usually associated with a yellow discoloration of the skin. hy·per·car·o·te·ne·mi·a ( hīpĕr-kārŏ-tĕ-nēmē-ă[medical-dictionary.thefreedictionary.com] Neonatal jaundice is relatively normal; bruises turn yellow when they heal; malaria, hepatitis, hemolytic anemia, pancreatic cancer and cirrhosis are serious causes of jaundice[symptomscausestreatmentprevention.blogspot.com]

  • Crigler-Najjar Syndrome Type 1

    Physiological neonatal jaundice may peak at 85–170 µmol/l and decline to normal adult concentrations within two weeks. Prematurity results in higher levels.[en.wikipedia.org] This leads to jaundice, i.e. yellow discoloration of skin and eyes. Excess bilirubin can also damage the brain, muscles, and nerves.[medindia.net] anemias attributable to enzyme disorders ( D55.- ) Marfan's syndrome ( Q87.4 ) 5-alpha-reductase deficiency ( E29.1 ) Metabolic disorders E80 ICD-10-CM Diagnosis Code E80[icd10data.com]

  • Rotor Syndrome

    Neonatal jaundice and Breast-milk jaundice Conjugated hyperbilirubinaemia Hepatocellular – Diminished hepatocyte function.[lifeinthefastlane.com] Introduction Jaundice refers to yellow discoloration of the skin, sclera, mucous membranes, and body fluids.[pedsinreview.aappublications.org] Infectious etiology of jaundice, autoimmune diseases, drug-induced liver injury, hemolytic anemia, α-1 anti-trypsin deficiency, Wilson disease and Gilbert syndrome were ruled[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]

  • Fetal Erythroblastosis

    Serum bilirubin kinetics in intermittent phototherapy of physiological jaundice. Arch Dis Child. 1984 ; 59 : 892 – 894 18. McDonagh AF, Lightner DA.[pediatrics.aappublications.org] After delivery bilirubin is no longer cleared (via the placenta) from the neonate's blood and the symptoms of jaundice (yellowish skin and yellow discoloration of the whites[en.wikipedia.org] Fetal erythroblastosis is a condition that occurs when the fetus and the mother are incompatible regarding the blood group, leading to fetal hemolytic anemia.[symptoma.com]

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