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966 Possible Causes for Hyperactive Brainstem Reflexes, Lactate Dehydrogenase Increased

  • Progressive Muscular Atrophy

    […] tendon reflexes, and Babinski signs.[neuropathology-web.org] In about 25% of cases, ALS begins with brainstem symptoms (dysarthria, difficulty swallowing) followed by extremity weakness.[neuropathology-web.org] […] causes initially increased electrical excitability leading to fasciculations, and later muscle weakness and atrophy; upper motor neuron involvement causes spasticity, clonus, hyperactive[neuropathology-web.org]

  • Acute Alcohol Intoxication

    T-wave oversensing can be a serious problem that often results in inappropriate device therapy. We report here a patient with binge alcohol use who received multiple, inappropriate ICD shocks due to T-wave oversensing from repolarization changes induced by acute alcohol intoxication and no other relevant metabolic[…][ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]

    Missing: Hyperactive Brainstem Reflexes
  • Alcohol Abuse

    From Wikidata Jump to navigation Jump to search substance abuse that involves the recurring use of alcoholic beverages despite negative consequences ethanol abuse alcohol abuse harmful use of alcohol edit English alcohol abuse substance abuse that involves the recurring use of alcoholic beverages despite[…][wikidata.org]

    Missing: Hyperactive Brainstem Reflexes
  • Contusion

    Home 2015 ICD-9-CM Diagnosis Codes Injury And Poisoning 800-999 Contusion With Intact Skin Surface 920-924 Contusion of lower limb and of other and unspecified sites 924-[icd9data.com]

    Missing: Hyperactive Brainstem Reflexes
  • Cholestatic Jaundice

    Lactate dehydrogenase is raised in haemolysis. LFTs : Alkaline phosphatase: considerably increased with either extrahepatic or intrahepatic biliary disease.[patient.info]

    Missing: Hyperactive Brainstem Reflexes
  • Iron Deficiency Anemia

    SHERSTEN KILLIP, M.D., M.P.H., JOHN M. BENNETT, M.D., M.P.H., and MARA D. CHAMBERS, M.D., University of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky Am Fam Physician. 2007 Mar 1;75(5):671-678. Patient information: See a related handouts on this topic at . The prevalence of iron deficiency anemia is 2 percent in adult men, 9 to 12 percent[…][web.archive.org]

    Missing: Hyperactive Brainstem Reflexes
  • Asthma

    Annual Review of Medicine Vol. 53:477-498 (Volume publication date February 2002) Lee Maddox and David A. Schwartz Pulmonary and Critical Care Division, Duke University Medical Center, Research Drive, Durham, North Carolina 27710; e-mail: [email protected] Sections Abstract Key Words INTRODUCTION ETIOLOGY[…][oadoi.org]

    Missing: Hyperactive Brainstem Reflexes
  • Myocardial Infarction

    In contrast to the rapid rise and decline of these two enzyme levels, lactate dehydrogenase (LD) levels begin to increase the first day after attack and persist at high levels[medical-dictionary.thefreedictionary.com] Enzymes such as glutamine oxaloacetic transaminase (aspartate aminotransferase) and lactate dehydrogenase are still being used for diagnosis of MI in some laboratories.[dx.doi.org] Raised troponin levels are associated with increased risks of death and recurrent MI.[dx.doi.org]

    Missing: Hyperactive Brainstem Reflexes
  • Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    Most of the aggressive lymphomas present with a rapidly growing tumor mass, fever, night sweats, weight loss, and increased levels of serum lactate dehydrogenase and uric[symptoma.com] One indicator of the potential for tumor lysis syndrome is an elevated plasma lactate dehydrogenase level or hyperuricemia at the time of diagnosis.[emedicine.medscape.com] The start of effective chemotherapy acutely increases the risk of complications, including hyperkalemia, hyperphosphatemia, hypocalcemia, oliguria, and renal failure.[emedicine.medscape.com]

    Missing: Hyperactive Brainstem Reflexes
  • Infectious Mononucleosis

    The Nurse Practitioner. 21(3):14–29, MAR 1996 Issn Print: 0361-1817 Publication Date: 1996/03/01 Checking for direct PDF access through Ovid Abstract Infectious mononucleosis is an acute, self-limiting, nonneoplastic lymphoreticular proliferative disorder characterized by peripheral lymphocytosis and circulating atypical[…][oadoi.org]

    Missing: Hyperactive Brainstem Reflexes

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