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700 Possible Causes for Hyperglobulinemia, Lacrimal Gland Enlargement, T-Lymphocyte Count Increased

  • Infectious Mononucleosis

    The Nurse Practitioner. 21(3):14–29, MAR 1996 Issn Print: 0361-1817 Publication Date: 1996/03/01 Checking for direct PDF access through Ovid Abstract Infectious mononucleosis is an acute, self-limiting, nonneoplastic lymphoreticular proliferative disorder characterized by peripheral lymphocytosis and circulating atypical[…][oadoi.org]

  • Precursor-Cell Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    The increase in the ALC was primarily from activated CTL019 T lymphocytes. Patient 1 was a 7-year-old girl with a second recurrence of ALL.[doi.org] Panel C shows changes in the circulating absolute neutrophil count (ANC), absolute lymphocyte count (ALC), and white-cell count.[doi.org] In both children, the absolute lymphocyte count increased substantially ( Figure 1C ) and the number of CTL019 cells progressively increased from baseline in vivo ( Figure[doi.org]

  • Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia

    Bing J et al. (1937) Reports of a third case of hyperglobulinemia with affection of the central nervous system on a toxi-infectious basis.[doi.org] Additional tests that may be done include: 24-hour urine protein Total protein Immunofixation in urine T (thymus derived) lymphocyte count Bone x-rays Some people with WM[nlm.nih.gov] Incipient myelomatosis or ‘essential’ hyperglobulinemia with fibrinogenopenia a new syndrome?. Acta Med Scand, CXVII (1944), pp. 217-246 [4] R.E. Cooke, R.M.[revistagastroenterologiamexico.org]

  • Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia 

    What is acute lymphoblastic leukaemia? Acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) is a blood cancer. The three main types of blood cells have specific functions: white blood cells – fight infection red blood cells – carry oxygen around the body platelets – help the blood clot. ALL develops when the body has too many of the[…][cancercouncil.com.au]

  • Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    It is characterized by hyperglobulinemia, excess bence-jones proteins (free monoclonal immunoglobulin light chains) in the urine, skeletal destruction, bone pain, and fractures[icd9data.com]

    Missing: T-Lymphocyte Count Increased
  • Lymphoma

    Lacrimal gland. The enlarged gland displaces the eyeball inferomedially. Eyelids. Swelling and prolapse may occur in the eyelid.[aao.org] Diagnosis The differential diagnosis of orbital lymphoma includes the following: Pseudotumor Orbital metastases Diffuse lymphangioma Lacrimal adenoma Cavernous hemangioma[aao.org]

    Missing: T-Lymphocyte Count Increased
  • Sarcoidosis

    […] conjunctival nodules, lacrimal gland enlargement, cataracts, glaucoma, retinal ischaemia, optic neuropathy, and papillo-oedema. w6 Hepatic or gastrointestinal (18%) —Typically[doi.org] Lacrimal involvement may lead to sicca keratoconjonctivitis, while bilateral enlargement of lacrimal gland is unfrequent.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov] Uveoparotid fever (Heerfordt’s syndrome) includes a combination of uveitis, parotid gland enlargement, and facial nerve palsy. w5 Many other ocular problems can occur including[doi.org]

    Missing: T-Lymphocyte Count Increased
  • Sjögren Syndrome

    gland enlargement, xerostomia with or without salivary gland enlargement, and the presence of a connective tissue disease, usually rheumatoid arthritis but sometimes systemic[fpnotebook.com] […] etiology, usually occurring in middle-aged or older women, marked by the triad of keratoconjunctivitis sicca with or without lacrimal gland enlargement, xerostomia with or[icd9data.com] History The first clinical description of Sjögren syndrome was by Mikulicz, who described a 42-year-old with bilateral parotid and lacrimal gland enlargement in 1892.[eyewiki.org]

    Missing: T-Lymphocyte Count Increased
  • Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    […] neck, or upper extremities, with liquefaction degeneration of the basal layer and epidermal atrophy, lymphadenopathy, pleurisy or pericarditis, glomerular lesions, anemia, hyperglobulinemia[medical-dictionary.thefreedictionary.com] […] resembling rheumatoid arthritis; diffuse erythematous skin lesions on the face, neck, or upper extremities; lymphadenopathy; pleurisy or pericarditis; glomerular lesions; anemia; hyperglobulinemia[medical-dictionary.thefreedictionary.com]

    Missing: T-Lymphocyte Count Increased
  • Leukemia

    Leukemia is a type of blood cancer that begins in the bone marrow. Bone marrow is the soft tissue in the center of the bones, where blood cells are produced. The term leukemia means white blood. White blood cells (leukocytes) are used by the body to fight infections and other foreign substances. Leukocytes are[…][medlineplus.gov]

    Missing: T-Lymphocyte Count Increased

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