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24 Possible Causes for Hypermotor Behavior

  • Eye Muscle Disorder

    […] uniqueness: any combination of frequent laughter/smiling; apparent happy demeanor; easily excitable personality, often with hand flapping movements; hypermotoric behavior[apraxia-kids.org] […] of words; receptive and non-verbal communication skills higher than verbal ones; Movement or balance disorder, usually ataxia of gait and/or tremulous movement of limbs; Behavioral[apraxia-kids.org]

  • Benign Familial Infantile Epilepsy

    Nocturnal seizures, with brief dystonic posturing, hypermotor activity, complex behaviors, and moaning, typically begin in childhood to early adolescence.[neupsykey.com] Affected family members may be undiagnosed, and a history of “parasomnias” or other “behavioral” problems in sleep should be sought.[neupsykey.com]

  • Familial Infantile Myoclonic Epilepsy

    Nocturnal seizures, with brief dystonic posturing, hypermotor activity, complex behaviors, and moaning, typically begin in childhood to early adolescence.[neupsykey.com] Affected family members may be undiagnosed, and a history of “parasomnias” or other “behavioral” problems in sleep should be sought.[neupsykey.com]

  • Angelman Syndrome

    Six children with AS (mean age 32.57 months) presenting characteristic behavioral patterns of AS (frequent laughter and happy demeanor, hand flapping, and hypermotor behavior[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov] behavior.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov] […] uniqueness: any combination of frequent laughter/smiling; apparent happy demeanor; easily excitable personality, often with hand flapping movements; hypermotoric behavior[friendshipcircle.org]

  • Early Infantile Epileptic Encephalopathy

    behavior, and easily excitable personality with uplifted hand-flapping.[genome.jp] The patient with features of Angelman syndrome, resulting from a 2-bp insertion (903insGA; 300203 .0013), had absence of speech, severe developmental delay, ataxic gait, hypermotoric[genome.jp]

  • Postictal State

    The symptoms vary based on whether they involve the temporal (automatisms such as lip smacking or picking at clothes, staring, behavior arrest), frontal (hypermotor behaviors[unboundmedicine.com]

  • Hypothalamic Hamartoma

    Her hypermotor seizures were successfully managed with oxcabazepine monotherapy, but she continued to have several weekly laughing spells and self-harming behavior.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov] Seizure onset occurred at age 7, and her semiology included nighttime hypermotor seizures and uncontrollable laughing spells thought to be gelastic seizures.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov] She had a significant psychiatric history including attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, depressed mood, impulsivity, threatening behavior, and suicidal ideation requiring[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]

  • HAIR-AN Syndrome

    Children with Angelman syndrome may be easily excited, hypermotoric and hyperactive. They are active explorers and often may appear to be constantly in motion.[rarediseases.org] Infants and children with Angelman syndrome have a distinct behavioral pattern marked by a happy demeanor with frequent and often inappropriate episodes of unprovoked, prolonged[rarediseases.org]

  • Mitochondrial Disease

    […] uniqueness: any combination of frequent laughter/smiling; apparent happy demeanor; easily excitable personality, often with hand flapping movements; hypermotoric behavior[apraxia-kids.org] […] of words; receptive and non-verbal communication skills higher than verbal ones; Movement or balance disorder, usually ataxia of gait and/or tremulous movement of limbs; Behavioral[apraxia-kids.org]

  • Nocturnal Frontal Lobe Epilepsy

    The authors also reported long interval from EEG origination to the beginning of hypermotor behavior.[omicsonline.org] […] type," "frontal lobe seizures with agitated behavior," or "seizures with hyperactive automatisms" ( Williamson and Jobst 2000 ).[medlink.com] […] as described above and, more seldom, protracted ambulatory behavior known as epileptic nocturnal wandering. 17, 22, 24, 25 These events can last longer than 2 minutes.[n.neurology.org]

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