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21 Possible Causes for Hyperreflexia, Inability to Supinate Forearm

  • Upper Motor Neuron Disease

    Dysdiadochokinesia refers to the inability of cerebellar patients to perform rapidly alternating movements, such as rapidly pronating and supinating the hands and forearms[nba.uth.tmc.edu] No spasticity or hyperreflexia.[brainscape.com] Examination reveals UMN signs in the legs (weakness, spasticity, pathological reflexes, hyperreflexia), although reflexes may also be brisk in the arms.[clinicalgate.com]

  • Autosomal Dominant Spastic Paraplegia Type 9A

    Dysdiadochokinesia refers to the inability of cerebellar patients to perform rapidly alternating movements, such as rapidly pronating and supinating the hands and forearms[nba.uth.tmc.edu] Hyperreflexia, extensor plantar response and increased muscle tone are the recognized UMN signs where as the weakness, muscle wasting, hyporeflexia, muscle cramps, and fasciculations[explainmedicine.com] All patients had, by definition, hyperreflexia and spasticity of the lower limbs, while weakness was present in only 53.8%.[jamanetwork.com]

  • Pyramidal Tract Disorder

    Dysdiadochokinesia refers to the inability of cerebellar patients to perform rapidly alternating movements, such as rapidly pronating and supinating the hands and forearms[nba.uth.tmc.edu] Brown-Sequard Contralat - pain and temp loss; Ipsilat propioception/discrimination loss, weakness; hyperreflexia Central Cord Syndrome Starts centrally, spreads out, 1st[memorize.com] Hyperreflexia and Babinski sign were evident in seven (88%) and three (38%) patients, respectively, but spasticity was not observed in any of the eight patients.[keio.pure.elsevier.com]

  • Muscular Fasciculation

    Dysdiadochokinesia refers to the inability of cerebellar patients to perform rapidly alternating movements, such as rapidly pronating and supinating the hands and forearms[nba.uth.tmc.edu] […] the character of fasciculations differs neurophysiologically in MND". [10] Another abnormality commonly found upon clinical examination is a brisk reflex action known as hyperreflexia[en.wikipedia.org] True muscle spasticity occurs in the setting of central nervous system disorders, and is associated with motor dysfunction and hyperreflexia, including abnormally increased[spine.org]

  • Ataxia

    This could involve rapidly switching from pronation to supination of the forearm.[en.wikipedia.org] : Clinical features Age of onset - 43-56 years Slow progression Gait and limb ataxia Dysarthria Occular dysmetria Slow saccades Decreased vibratory sense below the knees Hyperreflexia[emedicine.medscape.com] Motor examination showed lower limb physiologic hyperreflexia without spasticity, and power testing was normal. Sensory examination was normal.[neurology.org]

  • Acquired Wrist Drop

    forearm, reduced ability to supinate the hand, reduced ability to abduct the thumb and sensory loss to the posterior surface of the arm and hand.[bionity.com] MMN can usually be distinguished from ALS by its more slowly progressive disease course, the absence of upper-motor-neuron signs such as spasticity and hyperreflexia and the[mmcneuro.wordpress.com] […] extend the forearm, reduced ability to supinate the hand, reduced ability to abduct the thumb and sensory loss to the posterior surface of the arm and hand.[en.wikipedia.org]

  • Cerebellar Ataxia

    This could involve rapidly switching from pronation to supination of the forearm.[en.wikipedia.org] […] and decreased ankle reflexes); movement disorders such as chorea, dystonia, and oculomotor abnormalities; pyramidal tract dysfunction such as extensor plantar responses, hyperreflexia[blogs.nejm.org] Typical clinical signs and symptoms of autosomal dominant ataxias (ADCA) include the following: Limb and truncal ataxia Hyperreflexia and spasticity (pyramidal signs) are[centogene.com]

  • Brain Stem Disorder

    Dysdiadochokinesia refers to the inability of cerebellar patients to perform rapidly alternating movements, such as rapidly pronating and supinating the hands and forearms[nba.uth.tmc.edu] Progressive, symmetrical ophthalmoplegia, ataxia and either disturbance of consciousness or hyperreflexia.[patient.info] Hyperreflexia. Because of the loss of inhibitory modulation from descending pathways, the myotatic (stretch) reflex is exaggerated in upper motor neuron disorders.[nba.uth.tmc.edu]

  • Hereditary Cerebellar Degeneration

    This could involve rapidly switching from pronation to supination of the forearm.[en.wikipedia.org] Hyperreflexia bilaterally with sustained ankle clonus Plantar responses extensor No Pes cavus Sensory System: Limited exam but normal for light touch and vibration sense.[collections.lib.utah.edu] Unknown gait and limb ataxia, dysarthria, ocular dysmetria, intention tremor, pseudobulbar palsy, spasmodic torticollis, extensor plantar responses, reduced proprioception and hyperreflexia[en.wikipedia.org]

  • Distal Myopathy Type 3

    Inability to do push-ups.[sites.google.com] […] features History Physical Examination Laboratory Findings Creatine Kinase Muscle Biopsy Electromyogram Neurologic ALS [25] 35 Proximal & Distal Distal Dysphagia Spasticity Hyperreflexia[wikidoc.org] Trunk Accentuated lumbar lordosis, scoliosis, protuberant abdomen, difficulty sitting up from supine.[sites.google.com]

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