20 Possible Causes for Hypsarrhythmia in USA

  • West Syndrome

    Hypsarrhythmia rarely persists beyond the age of 24 months. … Asymmetric hypsarrhythmia. … Hypsarrhythmia with a consistent focus of abnormal discharge.[1]

  • Angelman Syndrome

    Differential diagnosis Differential diagnosis includes hypsarrhythmia in West syndrome or the petit mal variant pattern in Lennox-Gastaut syndrome (see these terms).[2]

  • Congenital Disorders

    suffer severe neurological impairment including profound psychomotor retardation and intractable seizures, eye abnormalities, optic atrophy, postnatal microcephaly, and hypsarrhythmia … The single patient thus far identified with this form of CDG exhibited severe psychomotor retardation, spasms, hypsarrhythmia, and irregular nystagmus (involuntary eye movements … Patients with CDG-IIm exhibit early-infantile epileptic encephalopathy, developmental delay, hypotonia, variable ocular anomalies, seizures, hypsarrhythmia, poor feeding,[3]

  • Beta-Ureidopropionase Deficiency
    EEG Shows Hypsarrhythmia
  • Neonatal Meningitis

    The electroencephalogram showed hypsarrhythmia intercepted by multifocal and generalized paroxysmal discharges and the brain MRI revealed a large right frontal cystic lesion[4]

  • Cerebellar Atrophy

    These become refractory as documented by the EEG which shows severe background slowing, multifocal origins, and hypsarrhythmia.[5]

  • Ganglioglioma

    Infantile spasms developed at age 6 months, an electroencephalogram revealing simultaneous hypsarrhythmia.[6]

  • Myasthenia Gravis

    Type 2 fiber predominance Atrophy No tubular aggregates CNS Cerebral atrophy: Progressive Delayed myelination Astrocytosis Neuron loss: Multifocal EEG Burst-suppression Hypsarrhythmia[7]

  • Leber's Hereditary Optic Neuropathy

    opticoacoustic nerve atrophy with dementia; diabetes insipidus, diabetes mellitus, optic atrophy and deafness (DIDMOAD or Wolfram's syndrome); progressive encephalopathy with oedema, hypsarrhythmia[8]

  • Optic Atrophy

    opticoacoustic nerve atrophy with dementia; diabetes insipidus, diabetes mellitus, optic atrophy and deafness (DIDMOAD or Wolfram's syndrome); progressive encephalopathy with oedema, hypsarrhythmia[9]

Similar symptoms

References

  1. Hypsarrhythmia - Wikipedia, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hypsarrhythmia
  2. Orphanet: Angelman syndrome, http://www.orpha.net/consor/cgi-bin/OC_Exp.php?…
  3. Congenital Disorders of Glycosylation, CDG, http://themedicalbiochemistrypage.org/cdgs.php
  4. Neonatal Citrobacter koseri Meningitis: Report of Four Cases, http://www.hindawi.com/journals/cripe/2014/195204/
  5. cerebellar atrophy | Hereditary Ocular Diseases, http://disorders.eyes.arizona.edu/category/clin…
  6. Modern Pathology - Mixed Conventional and Desmoplastic Infantile Ganglioglioma: an Autopsied Case with 6-Year Follow-Up, http://www.nature.com/modpathol/journal/v14/n7/…
  7. Myasthenic Syndromes, http://neuromuscular.wustl.edu/synmg.html
  8. Eye - Hereditary optic neuropathies, http://www.nature.com/eye/journal/v18/n11/full/…
  9. Eye - Hereditary optic neuropathies, http://www.nature.com/eye/journal/v18/n11/full/…