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34 Possible Causes for Impaired Heel Walking

  • Talipes Cavus

    Clinical features Toe walking : an abnormal gait, characterized by impaired dorsiflexion ; the toes point downward, while the heels do not have contact to the ground.[amboss.com] Gait instability Unilateral equinus: Leg length discrepancy: functional elongation of the affected limb while walking outward swing of the leg pelvic asymmetry and back pain[amboss.com] […] most common contracture found in patients with cerebral palsy Pathogenesis In cerebral palsy Spastic hypertension of the sural muscles Spastic contraction of the muscles impairs[amboss.com]

  • Foot Deformity

    Clinical features Toe walking : an abnormal gait, characterized by impaired dorsiflexion ; the toes point downward, while the heels do not have contact to the ground.[amboss.com] Gait instability Unilateral equinus: Leg length discrepancy: functional elongation of the affected limb while walking outward swing of the leg pelvic asymmetry and back pain[amboss.com] […] most common contracture found in patients with cerebral palsy Pathogenesis In cerebral palsy Spastic hypertension of the sural muscles Spastic contraction of the muscles impairs[amboss.com]

  • Wernicke Encephalopathy

    In less severe cases, patients walk slowly with a broad-based gait. However, gait and stance may be so impaired as to make walking impossible.[emedicine.medscape.com] Cerebellar testing in bed with finger-to-nose and heel-to-shin tests may not illicit any notable deficit; thus, it is important to test for truncal ataxia with the patient[emedicine.medscape.com]

  • Patellofemoral Stress Syndrome

    […] downhill Loads PFJ Pain walking uphill Tight Calf muscles Impaired gluteal control Pain when wearing high heels Increases load on PFJ Increases distal instability Pain when[physio-pedia.com] […] sitting with flexed knee (cinema sign) Tight quadricep muscles ( sitting they compresses PFJ) Pain while sitting with legs crossed Tight ITB (Glut max and TFL tightness) Pain walking[physio-pedia.com]

  • Ataxia

    Other impairments on the neurologic exam that may raise suspicion for a cerebellar disorder include: impaired heel-shin test, impaired finger-nose-finger test (dysmetria),[mdedge.com] These patients will have difficulty when walking in tandem.[mdedge.com]

  • Alcoholic Cerebellar Degeneration

    Other impairments on the neurologic exam that may raise suspicion for a cerebellar disorder include: impaired heel-shin test, impaired finger-nose-finger test (dysmetria),[mdedge.com] These patients will have difficulty when walking in tandem.[mdedge.com]

  • Prurigo Nodularis

    […] on the toes and heels,decreased or absent ankle reflexes, and/or mild impairment of sensation in the toes.[jamanetwork.com] […] polyneuropathy that was greater than grade 1 (mild) according to the AIDSClinical Trials Group (ACTG) protocol 251. 28 Grad e1 neuropathy was defined as preserved ability to walk[jamanetwork.com]

  • Spinocerebellar Ataxia Type 6

    There was no incoordination in the upper limbs, but the heel-shin test was slightly impaired. Gait ataxia was minimal and noticed only during tandem walking.[ruralneuropractice.com]

  • Congenital Metatarsus Varus

    Clinical features Toe walking : an abnormal gait, characterized by impaired dorsiflexion ; the toes point downward, while the heels do not have contact to the ground.[amboss.com] Gait instability Unilateral equinus: Leg length discrepancy: functional elongation of the affected limb while walking outward swing of the leg pelvic asymmetry and back pain[amboss.com] […] contracture found in patients with cerebral palsy As part of clubfoot deformity Pathogenesis In cerebral palsy Spasticity of the sural muscles Spastic contraction of the muscles impairs[amboss.com]

  • Muscular Fasciculation

    When walking on heels, left foot dorsiflexion was slightly impaired.[bjmp.org] When walking on heels, left foot dorsiflexion was impaired. What kind of physical finding is shown in this video? A. Myoclonus B. Dystonia C. Tremor D. Chorea E.[bjmp.org]

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