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23 Possible Causes for Inability to Supinate Forearm, Muscle Spasticity

  • Upper Motor Neuron Disease

    , in particular the limbs, where movement becomes more and more difficult The limb muscles begin to shrink and some develop spasticity, where they become stiff Pain in the[newhealthadvisor.com] Dysdiadochokinesia refers to the inability of cerebellar patients to perform rapidly alternating movements, such as rapidly pronating and supinating the hands and forearms[nba.uth.tmc.edu] Involvement of UMN results in stiffness of muscles (spasticity) and slowed movements.[mndnsw.asn.au]

  • Autosomal Dominant Spastic Paraplegia Type 9A

    […] through stretching exercises and muscle spasticity reduction.[rarediseases.org] Dysdiadochokinesia refers to the inability of cerebellar patients to perform rapidly alternating movements, such as rapidly pronating and supinating the hands and forearms[nba.uth.tmc.edu] Pure hereditary spastic paraplegia The main symptoms of pure hereditary spastic paraplegia are: a gradual weakness in the legs increased muscle tone and stiffness (spasticity[nhs.uk]

  • Pyramidal Tract Disorder

    […] the thigh adductors, deformity of the ankle from calf muscle spasticity.[pathophys.org] Dysdiadochokinesia refers to the inability of cerebellar patients to perform rapidly alternating movements, such as rapidly pronating and supinating the hands and forearms[nba.uth.tmc.edu] FAHN (Fatty Acid Hydroxylase-associated Neurodegeneration) is a rare NBIA disorder that involves muscle spasticity and dystonia, eye findings early in the disease, and progressive[nbiacure.org]

  • Muscular Fasciculation

    Muscle spasticity: Traditionally, spasticity is defined as the velocity-dependent resistance to stretch.[spine.org] Dysdiadochokinesia refers to the inability of cerebellar patients to perform rapidly alternating movements, such as rapidly pronating and supinating the hands and forearms[nba.uth.tmc.edu] Involvement of UMN results in stiffness of muscles (spasticity) and slowed movements.[mndnsw.asn.au]

  • Secondary Myopathy

    Caring for muscle spasticity or spasms (Medical Encyclopedia) Compartment syndrome (Medical Encyclopedia) Contracture deformity (Medical Encyclopedia) Creatine phosphokinase[icdlist.com] Inability to do push-ups.[sites.google.com] […] syndrome in neoplastic disease G73.3 Myasthenic syndromes in other diseases classified elsewhere G73.7 Myopathy in diseases classified elsewhere G80 Cerebral palsy G80.0 Spastic[icd10data.com]

  • Ataxia

    Physiotherapy - Physiotherapy helps prevent muscles from weakening or becoming stiff and spastic.[news-medical.net] This could involve rapidly switching from pronation to supination of the forearm.[en.wikipedia.org] […] of the muscles.[ataxia.org]

  • Hereditary Cerebellar Degeneration

    […] of the muscles.[ataxia.org] This could involve rapidly switching from pronation to supination of the forearm.[en.wikipedia.org] Skin/muscle Biopsy: Skin, muscle and Schwan cells showed no evidence of storage disease Clinical This 19 year old boy with autosomal recessive spastic cerebellar ataxia had[collections.lib.utah.edu]

  • Distal Myopathy Type 3

    Polyglucosan body disease involves progressive neurogenic bladder, spasticity and weakness causing gait difficulties from either primary muscle or nerve involvements, sensory[mayomedicallaboratories.com] Inability to do push-ups.[sites.google.com] Other features History Physical Examination Laboratory Findings Creatine Kinase Muscle Biopsy Electromyogram Neurologic ALS [25] 35 Proximal & Distal Distal Dysphagia Spasticity[wikidoc.org]

  • Polyglucosan Body Myopathy Type 2

    People with this condition have problems walking due to reduced sensation in their legs (peripheral neuropathy) and progressive muscle weakness and stiffness (spasticity).[ghr.nlm.nih.gov] Inability to do push-ups.[sites.google.com] Polyglucosan body disease involves progressive neurogenic bladder, spasticity and weakness causing gait difficulties from either primary muscle or nerve involvements, sensory[mayomedicallaboratories.com]

  • Brain Stem Disorder

    Dysdiadochokinesia refers to the inability of cerebellar patients to perform rapidly alternating movements, such as rapidly pronating and supinating the hands and forearms[nba.uth.tmc.edu] Spasticity is increased muscle contractions causing stiffness or tightness of the muscles that may interfere with movement, speech and walking.[aans.org] As the passive movement becomes quicker, however, at a certain point the muscle will sharply resist the movement. This is referred to as a “spastic catch.”[nba.uth.tmc.edu]

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