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191 Possible Causes for Increased Jugular Venous Pressure, Systolic Thrill at Lower Left Sternal Border

  • Ventricular Septal Defect

    3 to 4/6 holosystolic murmur (with or without thrill) at the lower left sternal border; this murmur is usually audible within the first few days of life (see table Heart[msdmanuals.com] Muscular defects can be heard along the lower left sternal border and may vary in intensity as the defect size changes with muscular contraction throughout systole.[circ.ahajournals.org] Small VSDs typically produce murmurs ranging from a grade 1 to 2/6 high-pitched, short systolic murmur (due to tiny defects that actually close during late systole) to a grade[msdmanuals.com]

  • Large Ventricular Septal Defect

    3 to 4/6 holosystolic murmur (with or without thrill) at the lower left sternal border; this murmur is usually audible within the first few days of life (see table Heart[merckmanuals.com] Small VSDs typically produce murmurs ranging from a grade 1 to 2/6 high-pitched, short systolic murmur (due to tiny defects that actually close during late systole) to a grade[merckmanuals.com]

  • Tricuspid Valve Insufficiency

    In severe TR, a right jugular venous thrill may be palpable, as may systolic hepatic pulsation and an RV impulse at the left lower sternal border.[merckmanuals.com]

  • Congestive Heart Failure

    Right heart failure is characterized by low output syndrome with increased jugular venous pressure, increased liver size and hypotension.[doi.org] Jugular venous pressure is frequently assessed as a marker of fluid status, which can be accentuated by eliciting hepatojugular reflux.[en.wikipedia.org] This includes serial assessment of weight, as well as estimates of jugular venous pressure and the presence of peripheral edema or orthopnea. 187 – 190 (Level of Evidence:[doi.org]

    Missing: Systolic Thrill at Lower Left Sternal Border
  • Atrial Fibrillation

    Head and neck Examination of the head and neck may reveal exophthalmos, thyromegaly, elevated jugular venous pressures, or cyanosis.[emedicine.medscape.com] Carotid artery bruits suggest peripheral arterial disease and increase the likelihood of comorbid coronary artery disease.[emedicine.medscape.com]

    Missing: Systolic Thrill at Lower Left Sternal Border
  • Cor Pulmonale

    […] and other neck and facial veins Increased jugular venous pressure Hepatomegaly Cyanosis Abnormal heart sounds Physical indicators of cor pulmonale on exam: Pulmonary hypertension[symptoma.com] jugular venous pressure) are often obscured by hyperinflation of the chest 6 which is present in a number of COPD patients.[doi.org] Right ventricular hypertrophy Right ventricular failure Increased chest diameter Labored respirations with retractions Distended neck veins Cyanosis On auscultation wheezes[symptoma.com]

    Missing: Systolic Thrill at Lower Left Sternal Border
  • Cardiomyopathy

    RATIONALE: Left ventricular non-compaction cardiomyopathy (LVNC) is a rare heart disorder related to thrombosis. Anticoagulant therapy is suggested for the treatment of this disease. The success of the novel oral anticoagulant rivaroxaban as a treatment option for this disorder is unclear. PATIENT CONCERNS: A[…][ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]

    Missing: Systolic Thrill at Lower Left Sternal Border
  • Pulmonary Edema

    Abstract Fagenholz, Peter J., Jonathan A. Gutman, Alice F. Murray, and N. Stuart Harris. Treatment of high altitude pulmonary edema at 4240 m in Nepal. High Alt. Med. Biol. 8:139–146, 2007.—High altitude pulmonary edema (HAPE) is the leading cause of death from altitude illness and rapid descent is often considered a[…][doi.org]

    Missing: Systolic Thrill at Lower Left Sternal Border
  • Myocardial Infarction

    Coronary Heart Disease A heart attack happens if the flow of oxygen-rich blood to a section of heart muscle suddenly becomes blocked and the heart can't get oxygen. Most heart attacks occur as a result of coronary heart disease (CHD). CHD is a condition in which a waxy substance called plaque builds up inside[…][web.archive.org]

    Missing: Systolic Thrill at Lower Left Sternal Border
  • Acute Myocardial Infarction

    Ventricular septal rupture (VSR) is a rare but fatal complication of acute myocardial infarction (AMI) with an associated mortality that ranges from 41% to 80%. The treatment consists of supplemental oxygenation, afterload reduction, intraaortic balloon pump, and surgical repair. In selected patients, extracorporeal[…][ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]

    Missing: Systolic Thrill at Lower Left Sternal Border

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