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30 Possible Causes for Involuntary Asymmetric Movements

  • Neuroferritinopathy

    J Neurol. 2015 Oct;262(10):2232-40. doi: 10.1007/s00415-015-7832-2. Epub 2015 Jul 4. Keogh MJ 1 , Aribisala BS 2 , He J 2 , Tulip E 3 , Butteriss D 4 , Morris C 5 , Gorman G 6 , Horvath R 7 , Chinnery PF 7, 6 , Blamire AM 8 . Author information 1 Institute of Genetic Medicine, Newcastle University, Central Parkway,[…][ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]

  • Parkinson's Disease

    movements 5 Apraxia, aphasia, sensory disorders, positive Babinski test, asymmetrical parkinsonism without impaired deambulation (difficulty in stopping gait), myoclonus,[aafp.org] […] sphincter EMG results; changes in urodynamic and sympathocutaneous testing; altered cardiovascular responses 5 Corticobasal degeneration Cortical and cognitive impairment with involuntary[aafp.org]

  • Early Infantile Epileptic Encephalopathy Type 6

    Of the V group patients, 6 were unable to elevate the tongue and 3 others had involuntary tongue movements.[neurologyadvisor.com] Sounds involving lip retraction (“eee” sounds) were within normal limits, while lip rounding (“ooh” sounds) was weak and asymmetrical.[neurologyadvisor.com]

  • Hemiballismus

    The tremor is an involuntary "pill-rolling" movement of the hands, jaw, face and legs. It is often asymmetrical.[academic.sun.ac.za]

  • Cerebral Palsy

    When performing motor tasks, three other features of involuntary muscle activation can be present: mirror movements can be present in patients with a hemiplegia or asymmetric[web.archive.org] […] diplegia: strong voluntary contraction of a muscle on the unaffected side evokes contractions in the same muscle on the opposite side; involuntary synergies can arise during[web.archive.org]

  • Nystagmus

    Head movements that are compensatory to nystagmus are a characteristic feature of spasmus nutans—a rare condition of childhood characterized by asymmetric pendular nystagmus[frontiersin.org] […] is that the head movement developed as a compensatory movement to the nystagmus, to maintain visual fixation in light of the underlying nystagmus that became an entrained involuntary[frontiersin.org]

  • Aromatic L-Amino Acid Decarboxylase Deficiency

    […] to frequent involuntary non-epileptic movements.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov] movements, and autonomic dysfunction.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov] We report the case of an 11-year-old male patient with AADC deficiency who also had epileptic spasms and generalized tonic seizures with asymmetrical features, in addition[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]

  • Progressive Supranuclear Palsy

    […] execute or carry out learned purposeful movements without clear motor or sensory causes (ideomotor apraxia), involuntary jerks (myoclonus), sustained muscle contractions causing[neurosciences.ucsd.edu] PSP with corticobasal syndrome: PSP-CBS is characterized by: the unilateral and asymmetric development of parkinsonism (rigidity and bradykinesia), loss of the ability to[neurosciences.ucsd.edu]

  • Frontotemporal Dementia

    There is asymmetric apraxia, accompanied by rigidity, myoclonus and involuntary movements of the affected side. Motor neurone disease.[patient.info]

  • Semantic Dementia

    There is asymmetric apraxia, accompanied by rigidity, myoclonus and involuntary movements of the affected side. Motor neurone disease.[patient.info]

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