Create issue ticket

105 Possible Causes for Jerk-Locked Premyoclonus Spikes, Progressive Action Tremor

  • Benign Adult Familial Myoclonic Epilepsy

    Usually, myoclonic tremor is the presenting symptom, characterized by tremulous finger movements and myoclonic jerks of the limbs increased by action and posture.[uniprot.org] […] cortical spikes detected by the jerk-locked back-averaging) ( Ikeda et al., 1990 ).[academic.oup.com] spikes detected by the jerk-locked back averaging (JLA) method), and a good response to antiepileptic drugs. 2 BAFME was first reported in 1990 in the Japanese population[nature.com]

  • Epilepsia Partialis Continua

    ) Cortical tremor is a form of rhythmic myoclonus, presenting as postural or action tremor in some patients with progressive myoclonus epilepsy (PME), 76, 77 in Angelman syndrome[clinicalgate.com] Jerk-locked back averaging (JLA) of magnetoencephalogram disclosed a spike preceding the jerk localized at the hand motor area, whereas JLA of electroencephalogram revealed[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov] […] been observed in some children with mitochondrial myopathy, encephalopathy, lactic acidosis, and stroke (MELAS). 75 Rhythmic High-Frequency Cortical Myoclonus (Cortical Tremor[clinicalgate.com]

  • Generalized Clonic or Tonic-Clonic Seizures

    premyoclonus spikes Hand tremor Neuronal loss in central nervous system Cutaneous photosensitivity Hyperreflexia Heterogeneous Weight loss Dystonia Splenomegaly Thrombocytopenia[mendelian.co] […] callosum Muscular hypotonia Infantile onset Intellectual disability, moderate Intention tremor Progressive neurologic deterioration Absence seizures Nevus EEG abnormality Jerk-locked[mendelian.co]

    Missing: Progressive Action Tremor
  • Spinocerebellar Ataxia Type 12

    SCA12 is a late-onset, autosomal dominant, slowly progressive disorder. Action tremor is the usual presenting sign.[jhu.pure.elsevier.com] SCA12 is a late-onset, autosomal dominant , slowly progressive disorder. Action tremor is the usual presenting sign.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov] All the patients had manifestations of SCA12-like phenotype prior to genetic investigations (familial late onset progressive action tremor in hands and/or tremulous speech[brain.oxfordjournals.org]

    Missing: Jerk-Locked Premyoclonus Spikes
  • Parkinson's Disease

    […] reduction in speed and amplitude of repetitive actions) and at least one of the following: (i) muscular rigidity, (ii) 4–6 Hz rest tremor and (iii) postural instability not[doi.org] (hand, leg or jaw; low frequency [4–5 Hz], asymmetric, disappears with action) - Excellent response to levodopa (70%–100%) - Progressive disorder - Severe levodopa-induced[dx.doi.org] Step 1: Diagnosis of a parkinsonian syndrome Bradykinesia (slowness of initiation of voluntary movement with progressive reduction in speed and amplitude of repetitive actions[doi.org]

    Missing: Jerk-Locked Premyoclonus Spikes
  • Essential Tremor

    Characterised by a progressive tremor of the upper extremities, present in posture and action, without other neurological signs or symptoms.[bestpractice.bmj.com] Essential tremor is a slowly progressive disease that causes shaking while assuming static positions (postural tremor) and during movements (action tremor).[blogs.biomedcentral.com] […] of Clinical Movement Disorders , explain more about the disease. 8 A slowly progressive disease causing shaking of the hands and head Wikipedia (CC-BY) What is essential tremor[blogs.biomedcentral.com]

    Missing: Jerk-Locked Premyoclonus Spikes
  • Mental Retardation

    One of several phenotypes associated with different mutations of the fragile X mental retardation 1 gene (FMR1), FXTAS involves progressive action tremor, gait ataxia, and[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]

    Missing: Jerk-Locked Premyoclonus Spikes
  • Unverricht-Lundborg Syndrome

    AMRF typically presents at ages 15 to 25 years either with neurologic symptoms (including tremor, action myoclonus, seizures, and ataxia) or with proteinuria that progresses[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]

    Missing: Jerk-Locked Premyoclonus Spikes
  • Progressive Myoclonic Epilepsy Type 8

    ) Cortical tremor is a form of rhythmic myoclonus, presenting as postural or action tremor in some patients with progressive myoclonus epilepsy (PME), 76, 77 in Angelman syndrome[clinicalgate.com] […] been observed in some children with mitochondrial myopathy, encephalopathy, lactic acidosis, and stroke (MELAS). 75 Rhythmic High-Frequency Cortical Myoclonus (Cortical Tremor[clinicalgate.com]

    Missing: Jerk-Locked Premyoclonus Spikes
  • Progressive Myoclonic Epilepsy Type 3

    , action myoclonus, infrequent generalized seizures, and ataxia) or with proteinuria that progresses to renal failure.[ 42 ] Despite severe neurologic disability due mainly[thieme-connect.com] (EPM4) has been identified to be caused by pathogenic variants in SCARB2 .[ 41 ] It typically presents at ages 15 to 25 years either with neurologic symptoms (including tremor[thieme-connect.com]

    Missing: Jerk-Locked Premyoclonus Spikes

Further symptoms