Possible Causes for Left Atrial Hypertrophy in ECG in USA

  • Left Atrial Hypertrophy
    Left Atrial Hypertrophy in ECG
  • Left Ventricular Outflow Obstruction
    Left Atrial Hypertrophy in ECG
  • Left Atrial Ball Valve Thrombus
    Left Atrial Hypertrophy in ECG
  • Large Ventricular Septal Defect
    Left Atrial Hypertrophy in ECG
  • Rheumatic Heart Disease
    Left Atrial Hypertrophy in ECG

    Rheumatic heart disease refers to a group of heart disorders that develop as a complication of rheumatic fever. It is one of the most common heart disease in children, particularly in developing countries. Rheumatic fever is the antecedent of rheumatic heart disease. As per the Jones criteria, rheumatic heart…[1]

  • Aortic Valve Insufficiency
    Left Atrial Hypertrophy in ECG

    Aortic valve insufficiency, also referred to as aortic regurgitation in cardiology guidelines and scientific literature, represents the incompetence of the aortic valve, causing diastolic flow from the aorta to the left ventricle, due to rheumatic valvular abnormalities, calcification, endocarditis, congenital bicuspid…[2]

  • Mitral Valve Stenosis
    Left Atrial Hypertrophy in ECG

    Mitral stenosis (MS) is a structural cardiac defect characterized by abnormal narrowing of the mitral valve orifice, thereby impeding left ventricular infilling. Rheumatic fever is the most common of mitral stenosis. Mitral stenosis presents many years following an attack of acute rheumatic fever and usually present…[3]

  • Aortopulmonary Septal Defect
    Left Atrial Hypertrophy in ECG
  • Mitral Valve Insufficiency
    Left Atrial Hypertrophy in ECG

    Mitral valve insufficiency (regurgitation) is the condition characterized by backflow of the blood from the left ventricle to the left atrium during systole, due to mitral valve prolapse, rheumatic or ischemic heart disease, infective endocarditis, cardiomyopathy or mitral apparatus calcification. Depending primarily on…[4]

  • Right to Left Shunt
    Left Atrial Hypertrophy in ECG

    Several congenital heart diseases induce right to left shunting of blood, during which deoxygenated blood from the right heart gains entry straight into the left heart. As a result, a very early onset of cyanosis and severe hypoxemia is typical in a right to left shunt. Clinical criteria, followed by imaging studies,…[5]

Further symptoms

Similar symptoms

References

  1. Rheumatic Heart Disease, Symptoma
  2. Aortic Valve Insufficiency, Symptoma
  3. Mitral Valve Stenosis, Symptoma
  4. Mitral Valve Insufficiency, Symptoma
  5. Right to Left Shunt, Symptoma