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291 Possible Causes for Mild Cerebellar Hypoplasia, Paroxysmal Activity - Spikes Temporal Bilaterally

  • Benign Adult Familial Myoclonic Epilepsy

    hypoplasia-hydranencephaly syndrome Multiple acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency Multiple acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency, mild type Multiple acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency[orpha.net] Multiloculated renal cyst Multiminicore disease Multiminicore myopathy Multinodular goiter-cystic kidney-polydactyly syndrome Multinucleated neurons-anhydramnios-renal dysplasia-cerebellar[orpha.net]

  • West Syndrome

    Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain revealed mild cerebral and cerebellar atrophy, high-signal-intensity areas in the white matter, and hypoplasia of the corpus callosum[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]

  • Epilepsy

    345 Epilepsy and recurrent seizures 345.0 Generalized nonconvulsive epilepsy 345.00 Generalized nonconvulsive epilepsy, without mention of intractable epilepsy convert 345.00 to ICD-10-CM 345.01 Generalized nonconvulsive epilepsy, with intractable epilepsy convert 345.01 to ICD-10-CM 345.1 Generalized convulsive epilepsy[…][icd9data.com]

    Missing: Mild Cerebellar Hypoplasia
  • Generalized Clonic or Tonic-Clonic Seizures

    Abstract Clinical course and long-term seizure prognosis were studied in 155 patients with complex-partial seizures during a follow-up of 10.1 /- 1 (SD) years. In 79% of the patients generalized tonic-clonic seizures were recorded, mostly within the first 3 years of epilepsy but occurring as late as 20 years after[…][ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]

    Missing: Mild Cerebellar Hypoplasia
  • Juvenile Myoclonic Epilepsy

    Juvenile myoclonic epilepsy is a condition characterized by recurrent seizures (epilepsy). This condition begins in childhood or adolescence, usually between ages 12 and 18, and lasts into adulthood. The most common type of seizure in people with this condition is myoclonic seizures, which cause rapid, uncontrolled muscle[…][ghr.nlm.nih.gov]

    Missing: Mild Cerebellar Hypoplasia
  • Idiopathic Generalized Epilepsy

    Idiopathic generalized epilepsy (IGE) is a group of epileptic disorders that are believed to have a strong underlying genetic basis. Patients with an IGE subtype are typically otherwise normal and have no structural brain abnormalities. People also often have a family history of epilepsy and seem to have a genetically[…][en.wikipedia.org]

    Missing: Mild Cerebellar Hypoplasia
  • Myoclonic-Astatic Epilepsy

    Myoclonic-astatic epilepsy, also known as Doose syndrome, is a type of idiopathic childhood epilepsy presenting with astatic as well as myoclonic component. It presents in children with previously normal development but can cause some degree of mental disturbance later in life. Myoclonic-astatic epilepsy (MAE) consists[…][symptoma.com]

    Missing: Mild Cerebellar Hypoplasia
  • Organic Brain Syndrome

    An organic brain syndrome ( OBS ), also known as an organic brain disease/disorder ( OBD ), an organic mental syndrome ( OMS ), or an organic mental disorder ( OMD ), is a syndrome or disorder of mental function whose cause is alleged to be known as organic ( physiologic ) rather than purely of the mind. These[…][en.wikipedia.org]

    Missing: Mild Cerebellar Hypoplasia
  • Encephalopathy

    Encephalopathy is a condition that affects the functioning of the brain. Such a condition can result from either direct injury to the brain or due to certain other disease conditions. Altered mental state is the major symptom of encephalopathy. In addition, affected individuals will also experience confusion,[…][symptoma.com]

    Missing: Mild Cerebellar Hypoplasia
  • Juvenile Absence Epilepsy

    Neurol Sci. 2016 Feb;37(2):289-92. doi: 10.1007/s10072-015-2411-y. Epub 2015 Nov 3. Author information 1 Neurosciences Research Center, School of Medicine, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, Iran. aliasadipooya@yahoo.com. 2 Department of Neurology, Jefferson Comprehensive Epilepsy Center, Thomas Jefferson[…][ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]

    Missing: Mild Cerebellar Hypoplasia

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