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10 Possible Causes for Moro Reflex Exaggerated

  • Hypoglycemia

    Moro reflex High pitched cry Lethargy, listlessness, hypotonia Cyanosis, apnea, tachypnea Hypothermia, temperature instability Poor suck, refusal to feed Transiently low[med.stanford.edu] Moro reflex, high pitched cry, seizures, apnea, limpness, poor feeding, cyanosis, temperature instability, and coma.[uichildrens.org] […] sepsis, respiratory distress, etc) Glucose screening is also recommended for infants with clinical signs consistent with hypoglycemia: Tremors, jitteriness, irritability Exaggerated[med.stanford.edu]

  • Hereditary Hyperekplexia

    reflex, and becomes more noticeable as the Moro reflex disappears. 11 When a pathologically exaggerated startle response interferes with normal activities, causing apnoea[pmj.bmj.com] […] shoulders, adduction of the arms, and flexion of the trunk and the knees, causing falling without a protective reaction. 9 10 It appears in infancy at the same time as the Moro[pmj.bmj.com]

  • Neonatal Hypoglycemia

    Moro reflex High pitched cry Lethargy, listlessness, hypotonia Cyanosis, apnea, tachypnea Hypothermia, temperature instability Poor suck, refusal to feed Transiently low[med.stanford.edu] Moro reflex, high pitched cry, seizures, apnea, limpness, poor feeding, cyanosis, temperature instability, and coma.[uichildrens.org] […] sepsis, respiratory distress, etc) Glucose screening is also recommended for infants with clinical signs consistent with hypoglycemia: Tremors, jitteriness, irritability Exaggerated[med.stanford.edu]

  • Cross Syndrome

    B, Patient 2, demonstrating exaggerated Moro reflex. Note the extended toes.[kundoc.com] Sudden sensory or auditory stimuli produced a prompt, exaggerated Moro reflex with slow relaxation.[kundoc.com]

  • Hyperekplexia - Epilepsy Syndrome

    reflex, and becomes more noticeable as the Moro reflex disappears. 11 When a pathologically exaggerated startle response interferes with normal activities, causing apnoea[pmj.bmj.com] […] shoulders, adduction of the arms, and flexion of the trunk and the knees, causing falling without a protective reaction. 9 10 It appears in infancy at the same time as the Moro[pmj.bmj.com]

  • Severe Neonatal-Onset Encephalopathy with Microcephaly

    […] responses · Classification of severity: o Mild HIE § Incr irritability, exaggerated Moro and tendon reflexes, sympathetic overactivity § Recovery by 2 days, no longterm sequelae[emilytam.com] […] matter § Prems, lower limb weakness o Focal/multifocal § Unilateral or bilateral cortex and white matter § Variable hemiparesis/quadriparesis § Stereotyped, nonhabituating reflex[emilytam.com]

  • Isolated Spina Bifida

    The Moro reflex usually becomes weaker as the signs of withdrawal become apparent. The deep tendon reflexes are exaggerated during opioid withdrawal.[quizlet.com] Correct1 Sneezing Correct2 Hyperactivity Correct3 High-pitched cry Incorrect4 Exaggerated Moro reflex 5 Reduced deep tendon reflexes Neurological signs of withdrawal in a[quizlet.com] Select all that apply. 1 Sneezing 2 Hyperactivity 3 High-pitched cry 4 Exaggerated Moro reflex 5 Reduced deep tendon reflexes A nurse is assessing the newborn of a known opioid[quizlet.com]

  • Rare Inborn Errors of Metabolism

    […] tendon reflexes and neonatal reflexes (Moro reflex).[ahcmedia.com] . 26 The early stages may be dominated by signs of elevated circulating catecholamines: tachycardia, pallor, diaphoresis, irritability, jittery movements or tremors, and exaggerated[ahcmedia.com]

  • Transient Hyperammonemia of the Newborn

    […] tendon reflexes and neonatal reflexes (Moro reflex).[ahcmedia.com] . 26 The early stages may be dominated by signs of elevated circulating catecholamines: tachycardia, pallor, diaphoresis, irritability, jittery movements or tremors, and exaggerated[ahcmedia.com]

  • Sialidosis Type 2

    Hyperekplexia: Familial, AD, exaggerated startle reflex, DDx: Stiff Man’s, stimulus induced myoclonus, startle epilepsy NEONATAL SZ BY TIME OF ONSET: 1 st 24hrs: (In order[res.mednet.ucla.edu] Sandifer’s Syndrome: GERD, nystagmus, arching/Moro, head version, /- torticollis, no LOC ?[res.mednet.ucla.edu]

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